Manokwari, Tari-perang

Manokwari, Tari-perang

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Manokwari war dance performed in Nusa Dua Fiesta 2012 in Nusa Dua , Bali , Sunday ( 04/11/2012 ) .

NUSA DUA , KOMPAS.com – Nusa Dua Fiesta ( NDF ) in 2012 in Nusa Dua , Bali , featuring art titled Indonesian archipelago Art Performance . This show seeks to lift a variety of local art that will be known by domestic and foreign tourists .

On the 3rd day , Sunday ( 04/11/2012 ) , a number of local arts appeared to entertain the visitors . One of the dances that more attention is Tari Arrow travelers from Manokwari . The dancers from the local community to make the audience did not move . Other dances are Rontek Singo Dance Ulung of Bondowoso .

Director of Bali Tourism Development Corporation ( BTDC ) , IB Wirajaya expressed his appreciation at the end of the event . ” We hope that more and more travelers know dances from around the country is very beautiful , ” he said .

In the evening , the audience was treated to an incredible musical entertainment in Indonesian Music Expo ( IMEX ) . Entertainment Balinese Wayang form Joblar appearance also appeared on the third night NDF . Puppet performances Joblar provide exciting entertainment for the visitors .

Meanwhile , the NDF also enlivened Fun Bike Nusa Dua Fiesta 2012, which followed 6,500 people , Sunday ( 04/11/2012 ) . They take two routes , namely the short route around five kilometers and cross-country route is 15 kilometers .

The participants consisted of people Nusa Dua , foreign and domestic tourists gowes of PT BTDC surrounds the front office area of international tourism and finish at Peninsula Island , Nusa Dua .

Committee Chairman Nusa Dua Fiesta Fun Bike , Made Sugiantara said , the participants are very enthusiastic cycling to passing routes that have been determined by the committee.

Manokwari, Velabhea war dance

Manokwari, Velabhea war dance

Manokwari

War Dance is one of the dances that originated from the name of West Papua . This dance symbolizes the heroism and bravery of the people of Papua . This dance is usually performed by the people of the mountains . Held when chiefs commanded to fight , because it is able to rekindle the spirit of dance . Papua is one of the provinces in Indonesia, which has a number of indigenous diversity , ethnic and cultural majority. From the results of the data collection team formed by the head of the Department of Culture and Papua and after in selection and determined through seminars involving Indigenous leaders , religious leaders , women leaders , youth leaders and community leaders representing seven indigenous territories , namely : Mamta Indigenous Territory , Indigenous Territory Saireri , Bomberai Indigenous Territory , Indigenous Territory Domberai , Ha – Anim Indigenous Territory , Indigenous Territory La – Pago , Pago Mi- Indigenous Territory , was as much as 248 parts . Determination of the number 248 is the native tribes while the data and the latest information .
The amount of diversity , we can imagine how rich research resource for scholars of anthropology , cultural , artist etc. . In the world of performing arts , the development of dance in Indonesia is closely linked to the development of society . James R. Brandon (1967 ) shows the development divide in Southeast Asia can be divided into four periods, namely : pre -historic period , approximately 2500SM – 100M . Period entry of Indian culture , 100-1000 . The influence of the Islamic period , from 1300 to 1750 . Period influx of western countries , 1750 – the end of World War 2 .
In terms of cultural anthropology in Papua , and analysis of developments in Southeast Asian dance , Dance War of the West Papuan people this leads to the artwork shows the prehistoric period . Papuan society , to this day while maintaining and preserving this dance as a form of respect to ancestors and dignity of a nation or tribe . This suggests that the development of society and the development of the arts is not disconnected from each other , but mutually sustainable . They believe that since the first ancestors of the people of Papua have always hoped , that a culture that has been passed down to each generation does not fade , do not drown and not buried by the ravages of time are increasingly growing forward . As well as cultural dances they have created with various waves of difficulty , distress and anxiety is not as fast forgotten by the next generation .
Many note that tells the inter- tribal warfare in Papua at the time of pre – history , such as Velabhea war dance , which tells a tribal war dance in Sentani . Papuan society uses war dance for spiritual encouragement in the face of warfare . But over the times and tough government regulations that prohibit the existence of inter- tribal warfare , this dance now only be greeters dance invitation .
Papua war dance is included in group dances , or even could be a colossal dance . Because there is no limit to the number of dancers . Like most dances in Papua , lacks any war dance drums and other musical instruments , the distinction is chanting war songs pep . Dressed in traditional clothing , such as beads decorate the chest , a skirt made from the roots , and the leaves are inserted into the body of evidence on the natural love of the people of Papua .

Merauke, Malind-Anim

Merauke, Malind-Anim

Malind-Anim-in-Merauke

Indigenous Malind-Anim in Merauke. One of the tribal portrait Merauke is Malind-anim tribe with traditional clothes are modern enough to wear pants with trinkets that decorate his body with the other indigenous Papuans. Malin tribe

Papua, Traditional Wedding

Papua, Traditional Wedding

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The people inhabit along the shore line of North West Papua were formerly resided mangrove areas and by Dutch colony they were moved to the shore in 1920 to use dry land for better health and easier mobilization. Around 1930 Christianity was introduced by missionaries from Dutch and people from Ambon, especially the teachers working there. Until today the people in those villages use the same clan name just like those in Ambon with the name ” fam ” which is probably originated from familie ( family ). When they were still living on the wet and damp land or higher places at the barren land, it was recorded that they also introduces such groups like clan called auwet. This type of kinship group had special skill respectively, for example auwet Bagre and Maban had the war skill, auwet Kibuan and Abowai inhabit highland had skill of farming and others. Each auwet is a patrilineal group who control the land, and after relocation in 1920 the system of auwet met fam and until today the terminology of fam is used.

Marriage tradition of the people living on north coast of west Papua is not facing the cost of wedding party as modern time but such an expensive cost of marriage dowry. Indonesian ethnographists recorded the kind of this dowry consist of a ” krae ” a chain of shells with big round shell as decor, a necklace composed in chain of dog teeth, belt from jewelry, wood skin rope, kitchen tools, canned food and often with cash as addition. Due to the expensive dowry, usually a man will get these items from his relatives, especially from his mother’s brothers, yet still will need long time to complete the items until it can be delivered to his parents in law. It was often this dowry can only be realized after marriage has been many years.

When marriage dowry has been collected,it will be handed over to his parent in law with special wedding feast or wedding ceremony. After the introduction of Christianity, the wedding ceremony has also been conducted in the church, yet the priest only visit the area around every 2 or 3 years. This type of wedding ceremony by religion can only be conducted after a couple has been physically married for years. According to the record of the church the first wedding was conducted by the church in 1937 when around 23 couples were religiously legalized marriage. Some of them even had been married for 20 years. Totally different, that traditional marriage cost to much, but by religious marriage wedding is no cost.

After the marriage, most of the couples live with the family of husband, due to expensive cost to build a house, beside the kinship system is patrilineal. In the past before Christian was not known, men did poliginy, the Christian forbidden them doing this and to strict with monogamy. The status of woman is not lower then a man, they do the same activities outside the house although often working together or doing the same activities together.

West Papua, Tarian Penyambutan Tamu

West Papua, Tarian Penyambutan Tamu

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A number of young men and women in Raja Ampat Islands, while featuring dance pemyambutan attraction to visitors, the island Saonek Monday, during the Festival and Travel Mart 2011 Raja Ampat, which lasted from 20 s / d October 23, 2011.

West Papua, Tarian Adat Raja Ampat

West Papua, Tarian Adat Raja Ampat

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One of the dancers from the Raja Ampat regency was demonstrating traditional dances Raja Ampat Society in welcoming guests to the Festival and Travel Mart Held Raja Ampat on December 20 to 23 October 2011 the last

Baliem Valley Festival, Wamena 3

Baliem Valley Festival, Wamena 3

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The main tribes inhabiting the beautiful Baliem Valley in the central highlands of Papua are the Dani, the Yali and the Lani.

Although now modernized, the Dani still strongly adhere to their traditions and customs, most notably the dress of the men. Even in this cool mountain climate, men wear only a penis gourd, known as koteka, though complemented with elaborate headdress of bird of paradise or cassowary feathers, while the women wear grass or fern fiber skirts  (sali or saly) slung around the waist. And to carry pigs or the harvest of sweet potatoes, women carry a string bag, called noken, slung from their forehead.

To defend their villages or to raid others to avenge for tribe members killed, the Dani practiced regular warfare. However, anthropologists note that the “Dani wars” are more a display of prowess and opulence of dress and decoration rather than an all out war to kill the enemy. Dani warfare displays competence and exuberance, rather than the wish to kill.  Weapons used are long spears, measuring 4.5 meters, and bows and arrows. Most often, therefore, there are more wounded than killed, and the wounded are quickly carried off the field.

Nowadays, Dani mock battles are held yearly at the Baliem Valley Festival in Wamena during the month of August (see Calendar of Events).  At this feast, which has as its highlight the mock battles among the tribes, the Dani, Yali, and Lani send their best warriors to the arena, wearing their best regalia. The festival is complemented with a Pig Feast, Earth cooking and traditional music and dance. 

There are also arts and crafts exhibited or for sale. 

Each tribe will come with their own identity, and one can see clear differences among them and identify tribes according to their costume especially the penis gourds each wears. The Dani men usually wear only a small koteka (penis gourd / penis cover), while the Lani tribesmen wear larger koteka’s, since their bodies are bigger than the average Dani, while the Yali wear long slender kotekas held by a rattan belt, strapped at the waist.

By attending the massive Baliem Valley Festival, visitors will have a rare chance to learn and experience firsthand the different traditions of each tribe participating in the Festival without having to make the difficult trek to their compounds deep in the hinterland of West Papua.

Baliem Valley Festival, Wamena 2

Baliem Valley Festival, Wamena 2

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The main tribes inhabiting the beautiful Baliem Valley in the central highlands of Papua are the Dani, the Yali and the Lani.

Although now modernized, the Dani still strongly adhere to their traditions and customs, most notably the dress of the men. Even in this cool mountain climate, men wear only a penis gourd, known as koteka, though complemented with elaborate headdress of bird of paradise or cassowary feathers, while the women wear grass or fern fiber skirts  (sali or saly) slung around the waist. And to carry pigs or the harvest of sweet potatoes, women carry a string bag, called noken, slung from their forehead.

To defend their villages or to raid others to avenge for tribe members killed, the Dani practiced regular warfare. However, anthropologists note that the “Dani wars” are more a display of prowess and opulence of dress and decoration rather than an all out war to kill the enemy. Dani warfare displays competence and exuberance, rather than the wish to kill.  Weapons used are long spears, measuring 4.5 meters, and bows and arrows. Most often, therefore, there are more wounded than killed, and the wounded are quickly carried off the field.

Nowadays, Dani mock battles are held yearly at the Baliem Valley Festival in Wamena during the month of August (see Calendar of Events).  At this feast, which has as its highlight the mock battles among the tribes, the Dani, Yali, and Lani send their best warriors to the arena, wearing their best regalia. The festival is complemented with a Pig Feast, Earth cooking and traditional music and dance. 

There are also arts and crafts exhibited or for sale. 

Each tribe will come with their own identity, and one can see clear differences among them and identify tribes according to their costume especially the penis gourds each wears. The Dani men usually wear only a small koteka (penis gourd / penis cover), while the Lani tribesmen wear larger koteka’s, since their bodies are bigger than the average Dani, while the Yali wear long slender kotekas held by a rattan belt, strapped at the waist.

By attending the massive Baliem Valley Festival, visitors will have a rare chance to learn and experience firsthand the different traditions of each tribe participating in the Festival without having to make the difficult trek to their compounds deep in the hinterland of West Papua.