Sumba East Prailiu-village

Sumba East Prailiu-village

Prailiu-village-East-Sumba--01

Prailiu is one of the many traditional and exotic villages in Sumba. It is located in a suburb area of Waingapu, the capital city of East Sumba District about two kilometers away from the city center. Despite rapid development, traditional tall houses with sharp leaf roofs are still apparent here. However, you can now see many zinc roof houses with different designs. The local government, assisted by the World Bank, is currently reconstructing local traditional houses in this village. Although most of the local inhabitants are Christian, they still follow local traditions based on their original religion of Marapu. Tall houses and burial processes, for instance, are closely related with their traditional beliefs. Their traditional houses have three parts, representing local cosmology i.e., underground as the home of the dead, the middle part as the home for the living, and the roof as the home of the Gods. In addition to traditional houses, Prailiu also has a number of original cemeteries. You can also find the famous traditional woven fabric and its weaving process here.

Sumba Villages

Sumba Traditional Villages

Sumba,  Traditional Villages,

Sumba,  Traditional Villages,

Sumba,  Traditional Villages,

Sumba,  Traditional Villages, Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia

Sumba,  Traditional Villages,

Sumba,  Traditional Villages,

Sumba,  Traditional Villages, Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia

Sumba,  Traditional Villages, Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia

Sumba West Anakkalang Village

Sumba West Anakkalang Village

Anakkalang-West-Sumba-01

The Sumbanese people speak a variety of closely related Austronesian languages, and have a mixture of Austronesian and Melanesian ancestry. The largest language group is the Kambera language, spoken by a quarter of a million people in the eastern half of Sumba. Twenty-five to thirty percent of the population practises the animist Marapu religion. The remainder are Christian, a majority being Dutch Calvinist, but a substantial minority being Roman Catholic. A small number of Sunni Muslims can be found along the coastal areas. The largest town on the island is the main port of Waingapu, with a population of about 52,755. The landscape is low, limestone hills, rather than the steep volcanoes of many Indonesian islands. There is a dry season from May to November and a rainy season from December to April. The western side of the island is more fertile and more heavily populated than the east. Sumba is one of the poorer islands of Indonesia A relatively high percentage of the population suffer from malaria and infantile death is high.

Sumba West Bondokodi Village

Sumba West Bondokodi Village

Bondokodi-West-Sumba-01

Bondokodi-West-Sumba-02
Bondokodi-West-Sumba-Pasola-03
On the western side of Indonesia’s remote island of Sumba, the local people practice the annual ritual of Pasola. Men, usually from opposing clan groups mount their horses armed with wooden spears to do combat with each other. Once a year this ritual takes place, with the blood spilt symbolising the fertilising of the soil prior to the planting season beginning in earnest. Pasola is often described as a game, but it is much more than a game. When the ritual is performed for real, blood will still be drawn. However these days Pasola will be “performed” for visiting travellers on certain occasions. During these events banana leaf stems will be used as substitute spears. Even in the “real” Pasola today the wooden spears do not have the sharpened tip of old to limit the damage.

Sumba West Ratenggaro Village

Sumba West Ratenggaro Village

Ratenggaro-West-Sumba-01

Ratenggaro-West-Sumba-02
Ratenggaro, Kodi, Sumba Island, NTT, Indonesia A traditional Sumbanese house is though of as representing a human being; the thatched peaked roof is called “the hair and the head, the four main pillars that stand on the ground and reach the peak are known as “the legs”. These houses are social units and also serve as clan temples. The verandah function as the place where the guests are received and there betel-nut is exchanged. Betel-nut exchanged is an important customs and when offered it represents a western handshakes, it is an insult to refuse the offer, although it is not necessary to eat it. The houses is also an important ceremonial center for funerals. Here the corpses are kept, prepared and mourned for a while the burials. Since death is the only way to join Marapu, the funeral is the most important and extravagant ceremony. Megalithic tombs with elaborate carvings symbolizing the status of the person, will be erected. A great toms might weigh 30 tons, take 40 men two years to prepare and 1000 men to drag it from the quarry to its site. The megalithic stones represent the first stone given by the creator to Marapu as compass to find Sumba from India. Since the Sumbanese believe the after world is a mirror of this world, status and wealth must be shown. Therefore his possessions will follow him to the grave and his animals will be sacrificed to honor him.

Sumba West Tarung Village Waikabubak

Sumba West Tarung Village Waikabubak

http://mikejkt.livejournal.com/22755.html

Tarung-village-04
Tarung-village-03
Tarung-village-02

Tarung_Waikabubak_-01

Tarung-village-01
If the lifestyle of the Sumbanese seems more interesting to you than art and history, you have to go to Tarung which is located almost in the heart of the regional center of Waikabubak Naturally (for Sumba) it’s still not possible to avoid megaliths completely even there: In general Tarung is the main village of 12 tribes of this region (at present there are only several families of tribal priests of local religion called Marapu staying here)… …what has first made this village the tribal center also has ruined it later: it really takes too much time and strength to climb up here: But at present it is just a burden with no benefits. None of the villagers would really consider such views as an advantage: It livens up here only twice a year – in June during celebration called Purungu Takadonga and in November for the whole month of Wula Padu ceremonies which start from the 1st day of full moon. Spirits of ancestors come to the village to be entertained by dances and singing, and fed by slaughtered animals. But those who are alive are not allowed to cry during this time – otherwise spirits can get angry… Tribesmen may also get angry: once in the 90th one local bureaucrat was killed immediately when he dared to overtake the grand procession…

Sumba West Wainyapu-Village

Sumba West Wainyapu-Village

Click to Enlarge !

Wainyapu_tone-800

Ratenggaro-West-Sumba-02
Discovering places like Rantenggaro is why we travel. Every time we start to get a bit jaded, we run across a truly incredible location like this which reminds us that – even in the 21st century – there are still discoveries to be made. The small headlands just west of Ratenggaro featuring half a dozen unique stone tombs is pure magic. Looking back at the huts perched perilously on the river-side cliff, the village feels like a surreal figment of – well – my imagination. This is precisely the kind of location I dream of finding, but rarely do.

Sumba West, Pero fishing harbour

Sumba West, Pero fishing harbour

http://www.flickriver.com/groups/sumbamystery/pool/interesting/

You have to see this site ! 350 nice pictures from Sumba !!!!!!!

Click to Enlarge !

Pero-fishing-harbour-Sumba-Barat-01-800

Sumba is an island in eastern Indonesia, is one of the Lesser Sunda Islands, and is in the province of East Nusa Tenggara. Sumba has an area of 11,153 km², and the population was 656,259 at the 2010 Census. To the northwest of Sumba is Sumbawa, to the northeast, across the Sumba Strait (Selat Sumba), is Flores, to the east, across the Savu Sea, is Timor, and to the south, across part of the Indian Ocean, is Australia.

Sumba, Waikabubak, Traditional house

Sumba, Traditional house, Waikabubak

Sumba-Traditional-house-01

Sumba-Traditional-house-02
Sumba-Traditional-house-03
Sumba-Traditional-house-04

According to the ancient Sumbanese myths, when the first ancestral house was built on the eighth heavenly sphere, the roof was covered by human hair taken during head hunting raids. Now dried palm leaves symbolically replace the human hair.

Traditional Sumbanese houses are built with tall peaked roofs that are topped with a projecting wooden beam at both ends holding a male and female figure made of carved wood or bound grass. The wooden beams on the roof are believed to be the entrance for the ancestor spirits to enter the house and give blessings to their descendants. The presence of Marapu is omnipresent among the living and the house is also seen as an important place of ancestor worship.