– South Kalimantan Nature Reserves, Mining, Plantations, Map

South Kalimantan

 Nature Reserves, Mining, Plantations, Map

Kalimantan south, kalimantan selatan, banjarmasin, mining, natural recources, nature reserves, plantations

 
It is often called the Province of a Thousand Rivers. One is Barito River, the largest and the longest river in South Kalimantan, and one of the longest in Indonesia at more than 600 km in length. One of its tributary rivers is the Martapura River, which in turn has two tributary rivers of its own, the Riam Kanan and Riam Kiwa Rivers. Barito connects with the Negara River which branches out into lesser rivers.

The population of the country consists of Javanese, Maduranese, Banjau, Bugenese, Chinese and Arabs. The culture and traditions are a real mix of the indigenous Dayaks, Malays, and Javanese, together with the influence of Islam which was introduced by Arab and Persian traders. This can be seen from the people’s way of life, especially in arts, such as dance and music, traditional dress, games and ceremonies.

Handicrafts are made from local raw materials. Jewellery made of precious and semi-precious stones are mostly made and sold in Martapura. Rattan and bamboo weaving are from the Tapin district, handicrafts made of gold, silver, brass and iron are from the Hulu Sungai Selatan region. Sasirangan is a specific textile design where its dyeing is a specialty of South Kalimantan. The designs and method are different from those of other parts of Indonesia.

The high rainfall and adequate sunshine have made South Kalimantan fertile. Extensive forests with a large variety of trees make South Kalimantan one among the largest timber producers in Indonesia. The region is well-known for its iron-wood, meranti, pinus and rubber.

South Kalimantan is connected with cities all over Indonesia through Syamsuddin Noor airport which is 25 km from Banjarmasin. This airport serves 737s, DC-9s and smaller aircraft. Airlines serving Banjarmasin are Garuda, Merpati Nusantara, Bouraq, Sempati and Dirgantara Air Service (DAS). The main runway was to be lengthened to 2400 metres to allow larger wide bodies aircraft to land. The work should have been completed in 2006.(we are not certain if the work is complete at this stage – if anyone has further information, please let us know)

South Kalimantan can also be reached through the seaport of Trisakti and Banjarmasin harbour. Plenty of good roads access towns in Kalimantan.

If waterways are preferable, go by boat along large rivers which head in almost every direction.

 

Mining

Mining sector in South Kalimantan Province is dominated by – oil and natural gas- and coal, but oil and natural gas is inclined to have decreased, coal precisely have very fast increasing amount. Coal production in 2004 reach 45,032,100 m³ tons with increasing reach 7% from 2003 that reached 41,344,695 m³ tons, whereas crude oil production was 394,976.00 tons and natural gas production 23,240.50 tons.

Mining potential in South Kalimantan divided into 3 groups, those are mining category A, mining category B, mining category C. Mining category A group consists of coal with reserved potential 5.6 billion tons, petroleum with reserved potential 101,974,400 m³, and nickel seed with reserved potential 42,242,000 tons. Mining category B group consists of iron ore with reserve potential 194,817,800 tons, gold seed with reserve potential 23,227,517 tons, jewel gravel with reserved potential 23,154,000 tons. Mining category C consists of limestone with reserved potential 10,291,116,760 tons, marble with reserved potential 1,236,097,000 m³, kaolin with reserved potential 194,187,800 tons

 

Mine Companies

Cempaka, Riam Kanan
Kusan District, Pegatan
Martapura, Riam Kanan
Meratus Mountain Range ophiolites
Riam Kanan
Rirang-Tanah Merah
 

Golf Courses

Banjarmasin

Swargaloka Golf Club

Address Swargaloka Golf Course
Jl. Ahmad Yani Km.24 Landasan Ulim, Banjar Baru Banjarmasin
South Kalimantan
Telephone 62-511-705040
Fax 62-511-705040
Website N/A
Email N/A
Holes N/A
Yardage N/A
Par N/A
Visitors Public course
Green Fees A
Course Designer 1972
Facilities
Club House, Restaurant, Locker Rooms , Pro Shop
Caddies

Tanjung Golf Club

Address:Jl Minyak
Tanjung – South Kalimantan
 
 

 

 

– South Kalimantan Nature Reserves

South Kalimantan Nature Reserves

Kalimantan South, Nature Reserve, Cagar Alam,  Wildlife Reserve, Suaka Margasatwa,  Hunting Game Reserve , Taman Buru,  Grand Forest Park, Taman Hutan Raya,  Nature and Recreation Park, Taman Wisata Alam,

 

  0 National Parks

 4 Nature Reserves

Pleihari Martapura Wildlife Reserve
Pleihari Tanah Laut Wildlife Reserve
Pulau Kaget Nature Reserve
Sungai Negara Wildlife Reserve

 

  23 Proposed Nature Reserves

Alabio Polder
Danau Bankau and other swamps in the Barito Basin
Gunung Sebatang Nature Reserve
Gunung Kentawan Nature Reserve
Hutan Bakau Pantal Timur  Nature Reserve
Kelompok Hutan Kahayan Game Reserve
Kuala Lupak/Nusa Gede Panjalu
Game Reserve
Meratus National Park
Pamukan Nature Reserve
Pleihari Nature Recreation Park
Pleihari Tanah Laut Nature Reserve
Pulau Bakut Nature Recreation Park

Pulau Kembang Nature Reserve
Pulau Sebuku
Pulau Suwangi
Sesulu Nature Reserve
Sungai Lulan dan S. Bulan Nature Reserve
Teluk Ampar Nature Reserve
Teluk Kelumpang/Selat Laut Nature Reserve
Teluk Pamukan  Nature Reserve

South Kalimantan Danau Bankau and other swamps in the Barito Basin

Danau Bankau and other swamps in the Barito Basin

Location:2-ª00′-3-ª15’S, 114-ª20′-115-ª25’E; in the lower Barito Basin, north from Banjarmasin to the region of Butong, South Kalimantan.

Area:480,000 ha (excluding marginal areas under traditional intensive use).

Altitude:Near sea level.

Description of site:
The vast alluvial plain of the lower Barito Basin and its left bank tributaries, notably the Negara River. On first emerging onto the plain, the tributaries form a complex depositional network of levees and back-swamps that supports the densest rural population in Kalimantan (towns of Amuntai, Kandangan and Rantau). The tributaries then flow through a zone of deep water swamps (including Danau Bankau, Danau Panggang and Alabio Polder) which serves as a sump or floodwater storage area. The deep water swamps then drain slowly across the extensive, level, marine coastal plain into the Barito River and the sea. Peat swamps are located in the shallow basins between the rivers which are permanently wet. Although the largest peat swamps in the Pulau Petak area have peat depths up to 190 cm or more and have a typical domed structure, most of these peats are young and comparatively shallow. The rivers have rather stable courses, but the Sungei Murung has changed its course in geologically recent times, leaving remnant channels in the lower Pulau Petak area. Annual flooding occurs during the wet season, from December to March. Brackish water incursion reaches about 30 km inland during the dry season, while tidal influences are felt up to 100 km inland during the wet season and up to 150 km during the dry. There are two open water lakes, Danau Bankau and Danau Panggang, with a depth of three metres or more.The four major zones are as follows: (a) riverine alluvial plain consisting of levees and back-swamps, subject to intensive land use including the cultivation of rice; (b) deep swamps (128,000 ha) consisting of open marsh with some permanent lakes; (c) peat swamp forest (186,000 ha); (d) marine alluvial plain (166,000 ha) consisting of alluvial forest with extensive secondary forests of Melaleuca, and potential acid-sulphate soils.

Climatic conditions:
Humid tropical climate, with an average annual rainfall of 2,500 mm. The wet season is from December to March, and the dry season from July to October.

Principal vegetation:
Deep swamps with lake vegetation, grassy swamps and open forest; peat swamp forest; marine alluvial plains with swampy grassland, alluvial forest and Melaleuca scrub. There is intensive, rice-based agriculture in the riverine zone, and kerangas forest and sandy terraces to the north. The acidic swamps and peat swamps continue west of the Barito Basin.

Land tenure:
The wetland is state owned (Indonesian Government); surrounding areas are under customary tenure.

Conservation measures taken:None.

Conservation measures proposed:
Consideration should be given to the establishment of nature reserves in the deep water swamps, at Danau Bankau or the lake area west of Alabio, as there are reasons to believe that these lakes support some unique elements of aquatic fauna and flora, not found elsewhere in Kalimantan (Central Planning Consultancy Jakarta, 1979). Detailed surveys are needed to investigate the importance of the area for waterbirds and determine possible reserve boundaries.

Land use:
Fishing, cultivation of floating rice and reed-cutting in the deep water swamps. The riverine zones of the Amuntai, Kandangan and Rantau Rivers are densely populated and under intensive cultivation, An attempt was made in 1936 to convert 6,000 ha of swamp at Alabio, upstream of the Sungai Negara, into polder, but the pumping capacity was too low and the project failed. Large areas of the polder have since fallen into disrepair. About 3,000 ha are planted with rice between May and August, when water levels are at their lowest. The polder supports an important fishery (8,000 metric tonnes per year) and is also an important duck-farming area (24 million eggs per year).

Possible Changes in Land use:
Many reclamation schemes are planned, especially in the riverine areas and marine alluvial plains but also in the swamps, despite the fact that peat areas and deep water swamps are usually considered to be unsuitable for reclamation.

Disturbances and threats:
Reclamation schemes and drainage projects; some 279,700 ha have been listed as suitable for reclamation. Fishing, reed-cutting and bird-trapping may be excessive in the deep swamps, especially those lying adjacent to densely populated regions. Extensive forest clearance in the water catchment area is likely to affect water quality.


Economic and social values:
The deep water swamps have a high value for flood control and as a source of water during dry periods. They are also important for fisheries and other traditionally harvested products. The peat swamp forests also play an important role in the hydrological balance of the region, as well as providing a good example of this ecosystem. At least 63,300 ha of swamps are listed as unsuitable for reclamation. In view of the large-scale reclamation schemes which are currently planned, these areas should be considered of high conservation value as they will eventually represent the only natural swamp habitats in the region.

Fauna:
A very important area for a wide variety of waterbirds. Species recorded during brief surveys in recent years include Anhinga melanogaster, Ixobrychus cinnamomeus, 1. flavicollis, Butorides striatus, Ardea purpurea, Leptoplilos javanicus, Dendrocygna arcuata, Nettapus coromandelianus, !chthyophaga ichthyaetus. Rallus striatus, Porzana cinerea, P. fusca, Gallisuila chioropus, Rostratula benghalensis, Tringa nebularia, Chlidonias hybrida (a common visitor) and Pelargopsis capensis. The endangered White-shouldered Ibis Pseudibis davidsoni has been reported and may occur in significant numbers in the more remote areas. Large roosts of Ardeola sp (500) and Egretta intermedia (2,000) have been located, and it is likely that there are breeding colonies of large waterbirds in the area. Other waterfowl known only from 19th Century reports, but which are still likely to occur, include Phalacrocorax sulcirostris, P. niger, Ixobrychus sinensis, Bubulcus ibis, Plegadis falcinellus, Gallinula tenebrosa and Himantopus himantopus.

Special floral values:
Probably the most important freshwater swamp in Kalimantan.

Research and facilities:
Basic faunal and floral surveys have been carried out, and there have been several feasibility studies for reclamation schemes.

List of Birds (28 species)
Species Red Data Book Cites
Anhinga melanogaster Lower Risk
Ardea purpurea
Ardeola speciosa
Bubulcus ibis
Butorides striatus
Dendrocygna arcuata
Dupetor flavicollis
Gallicrex cinerea
Gallinula chloropus
Gallinula tenebrosa
Himantopus himantopus
Ichthyophaga ichthyaetus Lower Risk App II
Irediparra gallinacea
Ixobrychus cinnamomeus
Ixobrychus sinensis
Leptoptilos javanicus Vulnerable
Nettapus coromandelianus
Pelargopsis capensis
Phalacrocorax niger
Phalacrocorax sulcirostris
Plegadis falcinellus
Porphyrio porphyrio
Porzana cinerea
Porzana fusca
Pseudibis davisoni Endengered
Rallus striatus
Rostratula benghalensis
Tringa nebularia

 

South Kalimantan Teluk Kelumpang/Selat Laut/Selat Sebuku Nature Reserve

Selat Laut/Selat Sebuku Nature Reserve

alt
Longitude (DD) 116.15078021
Latitude (DD) -3.25391137
Designation Nature Reserve
Status Designated
Current Status Not Known
Establishment Year 1981
IUCN Category Ia
Documented Total Area (ha) 66.650
GIS Total Area (ha) 85.902
Site Governance Government Managed Protected Areas

South Kalimantan Danau Bankau Barito Basin

Danau Bankau Barito Basin

alt
Latitude :
2 37 48 S Logitude : 115 10 12 E
Altitude :
0 to 0 metres
Area :
480000 ha Wetlands: 314000 ha
The area is the alluvial plain of the lower Barito River and its left back tributaries where these emerge on to the plain, notably the Negara River. On first meeting the plain, the tributaries form a complex depositional network of levees and backswamps that support the densest rural population in Kalimantan (towns of Amuntai, Kandangan and Rantau) The tributaries then flow through a zone of deep water swamps (including Danau Bangkau, Danau Panggang, Alabio Polder etc.) which serve as a sump or floodwater storage area. The deep water swamps then drain slowly across the extensive, level, marine coastal plain into the Barito River and the sea. Peat swamps occur on the nonriverine sections of the plain, reading a depth of several metres in the north where they have a domed structure. The four main landtype categories are: a. Riverine levees and backswamps; b. Deep swamps (128,000 ha); c. Peatswamps (186,000 ha); d. Marine alluvial plain (166,000 ha). ad a. The riverine zone has freshwater and intensive land use including rice including rice in backswamps. ad b. The deep water swamp zone has freshwater, open marsh vegetation and some permanent lakes. ad c. The peatswamps are under forest and have acid water. ad d. The marine plain has alluvial forest with extensive stands of Melaleuca. Rivers are tidal, especially in the dry season, and soils are often cat-clays (potential acid sulphate solls). Principal vegetation: Deep swamps range from open lake through swamp grass to open forest. Peatswamp forest on peat swamps. Marine plain ranges from swamp grass to alluvial forest, some peat swampforest and Melaleuca scrub.
Site Location
Danau Bankau is located on lower Barito basin, South Kalimantan.
Special Memmo
Danau Bankau is located on lower Barito basin, South Kalimantan.
List of Birds (28 species)

Species Red Data Book Cites
Anhinga melanogaster Lower Risk
Ardea purpurea
Ardeola speciosa
Bubulcus ibis
Butorides striatus
Dendrocygna arcuata
Dupetor flavicollis
Gallicrex cinerea
Gallinula chloropus
Gallinula tenebrosa
Himantopus himantopus
Ichthyophaga ichthyaetus Lower Risk App II
Irediparra gallinacea
Ixobrychus cinnamomeus
Ixobrychus sinensis
Leptoptilos javanicus Vulnerable
Nettapus coromandelianus
Pelargopsis capensis
Phalacrocorax niger
Phalacrocorax sulcirostris
Plegadis falcinellus
Porphyrio porphyrio
Porzana cinerea
Porzana fusca
Pseudibis davisoni Endengered
Rallus striatus
Rostratula benghalensis
Tringa nebularia

 

South Kalimantan Alabio Polder Barito Basin

Alabio Polder Barito Basin

Latitude : 2 29 5 S
Logitude : 115 8 10 E
Altitude : 0 to 0 metres
Area :6000 ha Wetlands: 6000 ha
Tenure : Government of Indonesia and local people

Site Description
A swamp area which was attempted to be converted to a polder. Construction started in 1936, but the pumping capacity was too low and the project failed. Large areas have fallen in disrepair. Some dikes have been cut through for fisheries! (8,000 tonnes per year). Each year about 3,000 ha are planted with rice in the dry season between May and August when the waterlevel is lowest. It is also an important duckfarming area (24 million eggs per year). Depth of water ranges in the wet season from one metre to two metres. The lower end of the polder is always swampy. The area is known to be important for waterbirds. Giesen (1996) reported that the site is a completely degraded wetland, suffering from severe soil acidification after dyke construction/draining. Of some importance to waterbirds in the wetlseason.

Site Location
Alabio Polders is located on upstream of the Sungai Negara, Barito Basin, South Kalimantan.

 

South Kalimantan Apar Besar Nature Reserve

Apar Besar Nature Reserve

alt
Longitude (DD) 116.28844080
Latitude (DD) -1.97121889
Designation Nature Reserve
Status Proposed
Current Status Not Known
IUCN Category Not Known
Documented Total Area (ha) 90.000
GIS Total Area (ha) 238.801
An area of mangrove, freshwater swamp and secondary forest. It is highly disturbed by logging and largely cleared and crossed by paths and settlements. It is therefore regarded as unsuitable as a reserve, although still some good mangrove and freshwater swamp forest may be left. These habitats cover a total of 46,000 ha of which 6,000 is tidal forest. Principal vegetation: Mangrove and freshwater swamp forests.

South Kalimantan Hutan Bakau Pantai Timur

Hutan Bakau Pantai Timur

alt
Location:3-ª07′-3-ª36’S, 115-ª59′-l 16-ª12’E; southwest of Kotabaru, Kabupaten Kotabani, South Kalimantan.
Area:66,650 ha
Altitude:Sea level to 300m.
Description of site:
A large area of coastal mangrove forest and Nypa swamps adjacent to a small area of dry-land forest.
Climatic conditions:
Humid tropical climate with an annual rainfall ranging from 1,285 to 3,785 mm. The average temperature ranges from 24-ªC to 26-ªC, and the relative humidity from 40 to 42%.
Principal vegetation:
Mangrove forest with species of Avicennia, Rhizophora, Brugwera and Sonneratia, and Nypa fruzicans; lowland forest with Dipterocarpus sp, Shorea sp, Anthocephalus cadamba, Gonystylus sp and Vitex pubescens
Land tenure:State owned; managed by the Forest Management Unit of Kota Baru, Forest Service, South Kalimantan Province.
Conservation measures taken:None.
Conservation measures proposed:
The area has been proposed as a Nature Reserve.
Land use:Fisheries; forestry in surrounding areas.
Possible Changes in Land use: Disturbances and threats:
Illegal wood-cutting, especially for firewood or charcoal, and hunting.
Economic and social values:
The mangroves protect the coast from erosion, and provide a breeding and nursery area for marine fishes and crustaceans important in the local fishery.
Fauna:
Waterbirds known to occur in the area include species of Phalacrocorax, Egretta and Sterna, and the kingfishers Pelargopsis capensis, Halcyon chioris. Maminab include Nasaljs larvazus, Macaca fascicularis, M. nemestrina, Hylobates sp, Sus barbaftts and Muntiacus muntjak. Reptiles include the Green Sea Turtle Chelonia mydas, the monitor lizard Varanus salvator and Python sp.

 

South Kalimantan Gunung Kentawan Nature Reserve

Gunung Kentawan Nature Reserve

(Surat Keputusan) Mentan No. 109/Kpts/Um/2/79, 10 Februari 1979. Luas areal 257,9 hektar. Hulu Sungai Selatan

alt

 

South Kalimantan Pamukan Nature Reserve

Pamukan Nature Reserve

Location:2-ª32’S, 116-ª20’E; 85 km NNE of Kotabaru, Kabupaten Kotabaru, South Kalimantan.
Area:10,000 ha.
Altitude:Sea level.
Description of site:
A mangrove and estuarine swamp forest. The mangrove is well developed
and little disturbed.
Climatic conditions:
Humid tropical climate with an annual rainfall of 1,200-3,260 mm. Average temperatures range from 25-27-ªC.
Principal vegetation:
Extensive mangrove forest with species of Avicennia, Rhizophora, Sonneratia and Bruguiera.
Land tenure:
State owned (Indonesian Government).
Conservation measures taken:
None.
Conservation measures proposed:
A proposal that the area be designated as a Nature Reserve (Cagar Alam) has been approved.
Land use:
No information.
Disturbances and threats:
Cutting of mangroves trees. There is a possibility that the area will be logged for wood chips.
Economic and social values:
The mangrove forests are of considerable importance as nursery and breeding areas for marine fishes and crustaceans which form the basis of the inshore fishery.