East Java, Remong dance

East Java, Remong dance

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Indonesian dance in many and varied and very beautiful motion of a traditional dancer ‘s body . This time will discuss about Dance Remong from areas of eastern Java .

Dance remong a welcome dance depicting typical East Java East Java dynamic character . Areas that use this dance include Surabaya , Jombang , Malang , and Situbondo . This dance is packaged as an illustration of the courage of a prince who fought in a battle. Hence the much needed masculinity dancers in this dance performance . Promoted dances around the 1900 ‘s , once used by Indonesian nationalists to communicate to the public .

When remong danced always accompanied by gamelan music in a gising consisting of bonangs , saron , xylophone , gender , slentem , zither , flute , percussion , kenong , kempul and gongs and rhythm slendro . Usually using Cadence gising jula – July Suroboyo tropongan . Remong dance can be danced with a woman or style of men’s style , both displayed simultaneously or alternately . This dance is usually displayed as the opening of an art ludruk dance or puppet .

Clothes worn by dancers from each region in eastern Java to dance remong has its own characteristics .

Yokyakarta, Festival Malioboro

Yokyakarta, Festival Malioboro

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Malioboro Festival was held back for a second time by the Department Tourism of Jogja. For this year, lasted for two days only, started from July 31 until August 1, 2010. As the name of this festival is centered around Malioboro.

Malioboro Festival is a cultural festival in which involved a variety of cultural attractions from music, dance and literature, from  Indonesia especially Jogja. Tourism Department tries to held Malioboro Festival because of  many requests from the Malioboro community to hold it back.

Different from  Malioboro Festival last year, this year followed by approximately 84 participants from the community Malioboro and 10 participants from community college students from outside Jogja. The participation from outside the region is one manifestation of the idea to improving the quality of roles that are considered partially icon Malioboro Yogyakarta city. And centers for culture-based activities. In addition, to improve the city of Jogja as a tourist destination.

Malioboro Festival was opened with a cultural carnival titled “Malioboro Street Carnival.” This carnival starts at 14:00. They began walking along the road Malioboro. The carnaval route begins with a parade carriage, as the traditional transportation of Jogja city. Not only andhong but also by several groups marching band. Residents and tourists, both domestic and foreign tourists crowded along the route of the carnival began. For this opening carnival, all road access to Malioboro was closed, thus making instantaneous congestion.

In the evening they held a variety of musical performances, titled “Rhytm of Malioboro” which centered on the Monument Serangan Umum. Various musicians will perform at this stage. Among other Malioboro Musician, Acoustic Reggae, and Percussion Baloka. They presents a variety of music that can be enjoyed by visitors.

All of Visitors who come not only enjoyed the  music, but also food stalls. Various food provided in Malioboro Food Bazaar. Starting from jogja special food, rice grilled up burgers. Visitors can come, buy food and sit around the stage while enjoying the musical offerings. They can entered free.

At Sunday afternoon they held “Imaginary of Malioboro” Many street painter of Malioboro show their expertise. They try to paint many object.

Finally Malioboro festival closed on Sunday night with the stage show, titled Panggung Bhineka Tunggal Ika entitled  “Harmony for Indonesia.” This stage is also based in Monument Serangan Umum. They offer ethnic and contemporary music and Wayang Kulit Performances lates into the night.

West Java, Sunda, Traditional Dance

West Java, Sunda, Traditional Dance

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The Sundanese are an ethnic group native to the western part of the Indonesian island of Java. They number approximately 31 million, and are the second most populous of all the nation’s ethncities. The Sundanese are predominantly Muslim. During the 2010 Census the government identified 1,128 ethnic backgrounds in the country, though total figures are not yet released for Sundanese. In their own language, Sundanese, the group is referred to as Urang Sunda, and Suku Sunda or Orang Sunda in the national language, Indonesian.

The Sundanese have traditionally been concentrated in the provinces of West Java, Banten and Jakarta, and the western part of Central Java. Sundanese migrants can also be found in Lampung and South Sumatra. The provinces of Central Java and East Java are home to the Javanese, Indonesia’s largest ethnic group.

Sundanese culture has a number of similarities with Javanese culture, however it differs by being more overtly Islamic, and has a less rigid system of social hierarchy.

The common identity that binds Sundanese together is their language and culture.

West Java, Sunda Adat Dress

West Java, Sunda Adat Dress

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The main part of this wedding rite is conducting an akad nikah (marriage contract) due to Islamic marriage law. It’s also called as walimah. Before an amil (a religious official), a wali (the bride’s male relative legally responsible for her), and some witnesses, the couple were married. Around this sacred moment there were some cultural happenings: singers on a stage in front of my sister’s house sang Sundanese songs in kliningan music, visitors kept coming till the evening, and cooks at the dapur (kitchen) were terribly busy.

The so called upacara adat Sunda (traditional Sundanese wedding ceremony) is in fact a somewhat new invention. Some notable cultural figures, such as Uton Muchtar, Ki Umbara, Wahyu Wibisana a

nd Hidayat Suryalaga, have contributed in this cultural phenomenon. Uton Muchtar, Ki Umbara, and Wahyu are well-known Sundanese writers, and Hidayat is one of the contemporary Sundanese authorities with deep knowledge of Sundanese living philosophy and cultural views. Thanks to them, Sundanese people can organize wedding ceremony in their own way.

Some books have been written in order to provide guidance for organizing Sundanese wedding ceremony, one of which is Modana issued in 1970s by PT Mangle Panglipur, the publisher of the oldest Sundanese magazine Mangle. The book was written by the late R.H. Uton Muchtar and Ki Umbara of Man

gle board of editors. According to the writers, the word modana is derived from a word which is known in the tradition of Sundanese people of Kanekes—foreigners usually call them Baduy people, the customs of which are seen as the prototype of contemporary Sundanese culture.

In Modana Uton and Ki Umbara describe the upacara adat in detail. It consists of seserahan (handing over the bridegroom from his family to the family of the bride), ngeuyeuk seureuh (preparing betel), nyawer (sprinkling rice, coins, candies, etc.), huap lingkung (letting the bride and bridegroom to feed each other a ball of rice, a piece of roasted chicken, etc.), etc., all of which symbolize  the way of building a family.***
Hawe Setiawan

West Java, Betawi Wedding

West Java, Betawi Wedding

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In traditional times, some marriages were arranged although it is also clear that sometimes such arrangements could be avoided. Early sources also indicate that some women were prostitutes and some men transvestites. Residence in the villages of Pelau and Luangiua is normally uxorilocal, at the house site of the wife. When residing on the islets away from these villages, the couple usually lives on land Controlled by the husband’s joint family. Traditionally, divorce could arise from adultery by either husband or wife, laziness on the part of either, ill treatment by the husband, or incompatibility. The couple would simply stop cooperating and live in separate places, sometimes to reunite later. Currently, Divorce is affected by Christian beliefs about marriage and it is subject to the laws of the Solomon Islands.

Domestic Unit. The family consists of a husband, wife, and their offspring. A household includes those families (or people) who are residing together.

Inheritance. Rights to land for coconut groves are held by joint families, which are formed through patrilineal descent, while rights to taro gardens are inherited from a mother by her daughters; rights to house sites are inherited through females, passing from mothers to their offspring. Personal property is inherited according to sex: a woman’s property goes to her daughters, and a man’s to his sons; the oldest offspring sometimes have a larger share.

Socialization. Children of both sexes are primarily cared for by their mothers until about the age of three. As they mature, boys generally associate with older males, including those from outside their household. Girls associate with older females but not so often with people from outside the Household as boys do. Formerly, there were numerous behavioral avoidances between brothers and sisters that derived from incest prohibitions. In adolescence, both sexes are influenced by their peer groups.

Java, Wedding Adat

Java, Wedding Adat

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In traditional times, some marriages were arranged although it is also clear that sometimes such arrangements could be avoided. Early sources also indicate that some women were prostitutes and some men transvestites. Residence in the villages of Pelau and Luangiua is normally uxorilocal, at the house site of the wife. When residing on the islets away from these villages, the couple usually lives on land Controlled by the husband’s joint family. Traditionally, divorce could arise from adultery by either husband or wife, laziness on the part of either, ill treatment by the husband, or incompatibility. The couple would simply stop cooperating and live in separate places, sometimes to reunite later. Currently, Divorce is affected by Christian beliefs about marriage and it is subject to the laws of the Solomon Islands.

Domestic Unit. The family consists of a husband, wife, and their offspring. A household includes those families (or people) who are residing together.

Inheritance. Rights to land for coconut groves are held by joint families, which are formed through patrilineal descent, while rights to taro gardens are inherited from a mother by her daughters; rights to house sites are inherited through females, passing from mothers to their offspring. Personal property is inherited according to sex: a woman’s property goes to her daughters, and a man’s to his sons; the oldest offspring sometimes have a larger share.

Socialization. Children of both sexes are primarily cared for by their mothers until about the age of three. As they mature, boys generally associate with older males, including those from outside their household. Girls associate with older females but not so often with people from outside the Household as boys do. Formerly, there were numerous behavioral avoidances between brothers and sisters that derived from incest prohibitions. In adolescence, both sexes are influenced by their peer groups.

East Java, Probolingo wedding

East Java, Probolingo wedding

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Probolinggo is a city on the north coast of East Java, Indonesia in Probolinggo Regency.

Like most of northern East Java, the city has a large Madurese population in addition to many ethnically Javanese people. It is located on one of the major highways across Java, and has a harbor that is heavily used by fishing vessels.

Under the Dutch East Indies colonial administration, especially in the 19th century, Probolinggo was a lucrative regional center for refining and exporting sugar, and sugar remains an important product of the area.

The city is famous for its mangoes, locally called mangga manalagi. Strong dry-season winds from July to September, the angin gending, help the mango trees pollinate and are sometimes credited with being the source of the area’s quality fruit. The city formerly produced grapes as well, but few grapes are grown in the area now.

The motto of the city is Bestari which is an abbreviation of bersih (cleanliness), sehat (healthy), tertib (orderly), aman (safe), rapi (neat), and indah (beautiful).

East Java, Madura, Traditional Dance

East Java, Madura, Traditional Dance

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Madura’s was home of area’s
best dance floor

by Gayle Faulkner Kosalko

Today when you drive by Five Points in Robertsdale you see the Purple Steer Restaurant, a liquor store, an Amoco station and Lever Brothers. It’s hard to believe that this was once the hot spot in the area for entertainment, but it was.

The Indiana Gardens Skating Rink was where the Amoco station is today.

This skating rink, which was pre-World War I, had live organ music (“all skate!”) and was owned by entrepreneur Mike Madura. His daughter, Evelyn Madura Halik, said that she knows dancing was going on there, too, from time to time because her father made a rule that the “shimmy” was not allowed on the dance floor.

Indiana Gardens burned down one winter. Ironically enough, Madura’s biggest venture would eventually suffer the same fate some 40 years later.

Next, Madura had a concession called Mike Madura’s Ball Knob. According to Evelyn, you stood at a certain spot and if you hit the door knob with a ball, a girl actually came down with a box of candy as your prize.

His game was located in Boardwalk Park. Boardwalk Park, which opened in 1926, was an amusement park with a miniature railroad, water chute and the biggest roller coaster in the Midwest, “King Bee Coaster.” There was a merry-go-round and a Ferris wheel, too. People often confuse it with “White City,” which was on 63rd Street in Chicago.

Further out where today’s Hammond Marina lies, was a nightclub out in the water called Hammond Beach Inn. Evelyn said there also was a small, but beautiful, zoo between Calumet Avenue and Lake Avenue in Robertsdale, too. The location for all this entertainment was ideal because folks could step off the streetcar and be right there within a short walking distance.

Boardwalk Park sold all their land to Lever Brothers and it is said, left all their equipment there. One of the buildings at Boardwalk Park was Danceland, where many a dance marathon had been held. Madura, always a man with an interest in entertainment, approached the owners. Madura owned 150 feet of land right across the street on Calumet Avenue. He bought the ballroom and, according to his daughter-in-law, Henrietta Madura, had the entire dance hall pulled across the street by a team of horses. Evelyn says that it cost more to move the building than it cost her father to purchase it. Henrietta said that by the time the huge structure was put in place, all the lights and the toilets were broken, but the beautiful dance floor was intact.

It was 1929, Mike Madura put his name in front of the existing “Danceland” title and what would be a part of the romantic history of our community was born.

Even today when you talk to people who went to Madura’s Danceland, one of the first things they speak of was its beautiful and highly polished dance floor. Every night Mike and his son, Mike Jr., had a ritual for cleaning the floor. They made their own special floor cleaner by grinding dance wax and paraffin together in a huge meat grinder. Dance wax alone would leave the floor too slippery for the 2,000 customers each night.

And while there were ballrooms in Hammond and Cedar Lake, it was Madura’s that was the king. Some of the history of Madura’s is featured in Lou Galt’s book “Ballroom Echoes.” But much of the history of the romantic place is written down in local church wedding registries because an incredible amount of couples met there for the very first time. My in-laws are one of the many couples who met at Madura’s.

Of the four evenings that Madura’s was opened each week, Sunday was truly for romantic couples. This was waltz night, and the mood was set with beautiful colored lights that switched from hue to hue.

Gayle Faulkner Kosalko is the executive director of the Whiting Robertsdale Chamber of Commerce.

Yokyakarta, Java Dance show

Yokyakarta, Java Dance show

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Dance

You can even see the court influences in the art forms. The dances of the courts of Java are usually slow and graceful, with no excessive gestures. The people followed these kind of approach, and as a result, slow-paced and graceful movements can even be found in folk dances throughout Central Java (with some exceptions). You can enjoy the beauty of Central Javanese dances in “Kamajaya-Kamaratih” or “Karonsih”, usually performed in a traditional Javanese wedding.