Drymodes superciliaris

Drymodes superciliaris,  Northern Scrub Robin,  Kucicasemak Alis

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The Northern Scrub Robin (Drymodes superciliaris) is a species of bird in the Petroicidae family. It is found in northern Australia, New Guinea and the Aru Islands.

Pachycephalopsis poliosoma

Pachycephalopsis poliosoma,  White-eyed Robin,  Robin Mata-putih

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The White-eyed Robin (Pachycephalopsis poliosoma) is a species of bird in the Petroicidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests

Peneothello cyanus

Peneothello cyanus, Slaty Robin,  Robin Biru-abu

The Slaty Robin (Peneothello cyanus), also known as the Blue-grey Robin, is a species of bird in the family Petroicidae native to Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.Peneothello-cyanus

Described by Italian naturalist Tommaso Salvadori in 1874, the Slaty Robin is a member of the Australasian Robin family Petroicidae, or Eopsaltridae.[2] Sibley and Ahlquist’s DNA-DNA hybridisation studies placed this group in a Corvida parvorder comprising many tropical and Australian passerines including pardalotes, fairy-wrens, honeyeaters and crows.[3] However, subsequent molecular research (and current consensus) places the robins as a very early offshoot of the Passerida (or “advanced” songbirds), within the songbird lineage.[4]

Measuring 14 to 15 cm (5.5–6 in), the Slaty Robin has fairly uniform blue-grey plumage, which is slightly lighter underneath and slightly darker on the cheeks and face. The tail and flight feathers are grey-black. The bill and feet are black, and the eyes are dark brown.[5]

The Slaty Robin is found in the highlands of New Guinea from altitudes of 900 to 2750 m (3000–9000 ft). Within the rainforest it is found in pairs in the understory or on the ground. It is insectivorous, and hunts by gleaning. It eats ants, beetles, and thyonnid wasps.[5]

The nest is a deep cup made of rootlets and lined with moss, and is generally placed in a tree fork around 6 m (20 ft) above the ground. One or two pale-greenish or olive eggs splotched with olive or brown are laid, and measure 23.5 mm x 17–19 mm

Poecilodryas albonotata

Poecilodryas albonotata, Black-throated Robin,  Robin Leher-hitam

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The Black-throated Robin (Poecilodryas albonotata) is a species of bird in the family Petroicidae. It is found on the island of New Guinea in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests at 1,150–2,750 metres above sea-level.

Described by Gregory Mathews in 1920, the Black-throated Robin is a member of the Australasian Robin family Petroicidae. Its genus name is derived from the Ancient Greek words poikilos “little” and dryas “dryad”, and the species name albonotata is derived from the Latin words albus “white” and notata “marked”. Sibley and Ahlquist’s DNA-DNA hybridisation studies placed this group in a Corvida parvorder comprising many tropical and Australian passerines including pardalotes, fairy-wrens, honeyeaters and crows.[2] However, subsequent molecular research (and current consensus) places the robins as a very early offshoot of the Passerida (or “advanced” songbirds) within the songbird lineage.[3]

Measuring 18 to 19 cm (7–8 in), the Black-throated Robin has a grey-black face, throat and upper breast with a grey crown and nape, and a white diagonal mark on the neck. The upperparts are blue-grey, and the underparts grey to white over the abdomen and under the tail coverts. The bill and legs are black, and the eyes are dark brown. The plumage is reminiscent of a cuckoo-shrike but the white neck marking is diagnostic.[4]

The Black-throated Robin is found predominantly in rainforests along the central highlands of New Guinea, from the Bird’s Head Peninsula in the west to the Huon Peninsula in the east, at altitudes from 1800 to 2750 m (6000–9000 ft). Within the rainforest, it is found singly in the understory or on the ground. It is insectivorous, and hunts by gleaning.

Poecilodryas placens

Poecilodryas placens,  Olive-yellow Robin,  Robin Kuning

The Banded Yellow Robin or Olive-yellow Robin (Poecilodryas placens) is a species of bird in the Petroicidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.Poecilodryas-placens

Amalocichla incerta

Amalocichla incerta,  Lesser Ground Robin,  Anis Papua-kecil

The Lesser Ground Robin (Amalocichla incerta) is a species of bird in the Petroicidae family. It is found in West Papua, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea.Amalocichla-incerta

Pachycephalopsis hattamensis

Pachycephalopsis hattamensis,  Green-backed Robin,  Robin Hijau

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The Green-backed Robin (Pachycephalopsis hattamensis) is a species of bird in the Petroicidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.

Poecilodryas hypoleuca

Poecilodryas hypoleuca,  Black-sided Robin,  Robin Belang

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The Black-sided Robin (Poecilodryas hypoleuca), also known as the Pied Robin, is a species of bird in the family Petroicidae. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.

The genus name is derived from the Ancient Greek words poikilos “little” and dryas “dryad”, and the species name hypoleuca is derived from the Ancient Greek words hypo- “under” and leukos “white”. Sibley and Ahlquist’s DNA-DNA hybridisation studies placed this group in a Corvida parvorder comprising many tropical and Australian passerines including pardalotes, fairy-wrens, honeyeaters and crows.[2] However, subsequent molecular research (and current consensus) places the robins as a very early offshoot of the Passerida (or “advanced” songbirds) within the songbird lineage.[3]

Measuring 13 to 15 cm (5–6 in), the Black-sided Robin has black and white plumage. The upperparts including the crown, nape, back, wings and tail are black or brownish-black, as is its eye-stripe. It has white eyebrows, throat and underparts and a white patch on the wings. The bill is black, and the eyes are dark brown, and the legs grey or pink.[4]

The Black-sided Robin is found across New Guinea from the Huon Peninsula west to the western limits of West Papua and West Papuan Islands, although is absent from the transfly region in the south. It inhabits predominantly lowland rainforests and swamp forests from sea level to 1200 m (4000 ft). Within the rainforest it is found singly or in pairs in the understory or on the ground. Shy, it is more often heard than seen. It is insectivorous, and hunts by gleaning and snatching insects from tree trunks and branches, and on the ground.

Poecilodryas brachyura

Poecilodryas brachyura, Black-chinned Robin,  Robin Dagu-hitam

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The Black-chinned Robin (Poecilodryas brachyura) is a species of bird in the family Petroicidae found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.

Described by English naturalist Philip Sclater in 1874, the Black-chinned Robin is a member of the Australasian Robin family Petroicidae. Its genus name is derived from the Ancient Greek words poikilos “little” and dryas “dryad”, and the species name brachyura is derived from the Ancient Greek words brachys “short” and ouros “tail”. Sibley and Ahlquist’s DNA-DNA hybridisation studies placed this group in a Corvida parvorder comprising many tropical and Australian passerines including pardalotes, fairy-wrens, honeyeaters and crows.[2] However, subsequent molecular research (and current consensus) places the robins as a very early offshoot of the Passerida (or “advanced” songbirds) within the songbird lineage.[3]

Measuring 14 to 15 cm (5.5–6 in), the Black-chinned Robin has dark brown to black head and upperparts with a prominent white stripe or “eyebrow” above the eye. The chin is black immediately under the bill. Its tail is markedly shorter than other Australasian robins. The throat and underparts are white, and there is a white bar on the otherwise dark-plumaged wing. The bill is black, the eyes are dark brown, and the legs pale brown or pink. Its song is a descending series of notes and resembles that of the Fan-tailed Cuckoo.[4]

The Black-chinned Robin is found predominantly in the lowland forests of northwestern and central New Guinea (mainly in West Papua and only a little in Papua New Guinea’s northwest) from sea level to 650 m (2000 ft). Within the rainforest it is found in pairs in the understory or on the ground. It is insectivorous, and hunts by gleaning. It is a weak flye

Peneoenanthe pulverulenta

Peneoenanthe pulverulenta,  Mangrove Robin,  Robin Bakau

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The Mangrove Robin (Peneoenanthe pulverulenta) is a species of bird in the Petroicidae family.

It is found in Australia, Indonesia, and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical mangrove forests.