– Palms & Cycads

67 Palms &  Cycads pages

Click on your favorite Plant

   

Acoelorrhaphe
wrightii

Acrocomia aculeata

Areca catechu

Areca catechu

Arenga engleri

Arenga pinnata

Attalea cohune

Beaucarnea
recurvata

Bismarckia nobilis

Borassus flabellifer

Butia capitata

Metroxylum sagu

Caryota mitis

Carpentaria
acuminata

Caryota urens

Chamaedorea
metallica

Chamaedorea
microspadix

Chamaedorea
radicalis

Chamaedorea
seifrizii

Hyophorbe
verschaffeltii

Cocos nucifera

Chamaerops
humilis

Coccothrinax
barbadensis

Copernicia
macroglossa

Copernicia
prunifera

Corypha umbraculifera

Cycas circinalis

Cycas revoluta

Cycas rumphii

Cyrtostachys renda

Dictyosperma
album

Dioon edule

Dioon spinulosum

Dypsis cabadae

Elaeis guinensis

Howea forsteriana

Hyophorbe
lagenicaulis

Hyophorbe
verschaffeltii

Jubaea chilensisnsis

Licuala grandis Livistona
decipiens

Livistona chinensis

Neodypis decaryi

Nannorrhops
ritchieana

Phoenix dactylifera

Phoenix reclinata

Phoenix roebelenii

Phoenix rupicola

Pritchardia pacifica

Ravenala
madagascariensis

Ravenea spp.

Rhapis excelsa

Rhapis humilis

Roystonia regina

Sabal causiarum

Sabal domingensis

Sabal mexicana

Sabal minor

Sabal domingensis

Serenoa repens

Salacca zalacca

Syagrus
romanzoffiana

Trachycarpus
fortunei

Veitchia merilii

Washingtonia
filifera

Washingtonia
robusta

   

Zamia furfuracea

Zamia pumila

Coccothrinax barbadensis

Coccothrinax barbadensis Barbados silver palm   Palmae
 

Barbados silver palm, silver palm, thatch palm, Lesser Antilles silver thatch palm, Coccothrinax barbadensis

http://www.floridata.com

Barbados silver palm, silver palm, thatch palm, Lesser Antilles silver thatch palm, Coccothrinax barbadensis

Coccothrinax barbadensis
Common Names: Barbados silver palm, silver palm, thatch palm, Lesser Antilles silver thatch palm
Family: Arecacea/Palmae (palm Family)
Palm Attracts Birds Has evergreen foliage Has Unusual or Interesting Foliage

Description
The graceful Barbados silver palm has an open crown of fan-shaped (palmate) leaves that are green on topsides and silvery-white on the undersides. The leaves often rotate when the wind blows, creating beautiful alternating patterns of green and silvery white. Silver palm leaves are about 40 in (102 cm) across and there are 36-60 leaflets in each leaf. The middle leaflets are about 25-30 in (63.5-76.2 cm) long. Silver palm has a slender, cylindrical trunk which gets 8-50 ft (2.4-15.2 m) tall and 2-7 in (5.1-17.8 cm) in diameter. Most of the trunk is bare, but usually there are some thick black fibers on the upper trunk area, just below the leaves. Silver palm blooms in the summer with a dense and multi-flowered inflorescence consisting of 3-10 branches bearing white flowers. In winter, silver palm may produce as many as 1300 bunches of round purple-black fruits from 0.25-3 in (0.6-7.6 cm) in diameter. Each bunch may weigh 2 pounds (0.9 kg), which means an adult silver palm may produce 2600 pounds (1179 kg) of fruit! The seeds within the fruits are unusual in that each has six or more narrow, branched grooves.

Location
Barbados silver palm occurs naturally in Puerto Rico, Trinidad, Tobago, the Virgin Islands, Venezuela (Margarita Island) and the Windward and Leeward islands (Antigua, Barbados, Barbuda, Dominica, Guadeloupe, Marie Galante, Martinique, St. Lucia). In the wild, silver palm grows in coastal forests and scrub woodlands on limestone soils from sea level to 2000 ft (610 m) elevation.

Culture
Silver palm grows best in tropical regions and needs a sunny position in well-drained soil. A slow grower in its native state, silver palm responds very well to regular applications of palm fertilizer. Silver palm grows well in limestone and sandy soils.
Light: Silver palms thrive in full sun. Small silver palms make good indoor plants and require bright, though indirect light.
Moisture: Silver palms do best on well drained, alkaline soils with frequent watering.
Hardiness: USDA Zones 9 – 12. Mature and established silver palms can tolerate temperatures down to 26ºF (-3.3ºC) Juvenile silver palms need protection during freezing temperatures.
Propagation: By seeds. Viable silver palm seeds are reported to germinate in three months or more.

silver palms
A group of silver palms make a spectacular sight as they reach for the sky at the Fairchild Tropical Garden in Miami, Florida.
Usage
The tall and graceful silver palm is perfect for lining streets, driveways and boulevards. Use silver palm in natural and formal groupings and groves in large, open areas. Young plants can be grown in containers and give a tropical look to decks, patios and porches. Young silver palms also can be grown indoors in atriums or conservatories that have bright light. The silver palm is a good choice for planting in limestone-rich and calcareous soils. Silver palm should not be planted under power lines as it can grow up to 50 ft (15.2 m) tall.

Features
Silver palm’s graceful leaves appear to wink from green to silvery-white and back to green as they twist and twirl in a gentle breeze. In some of its natural habitats, overcollecting and land clearing are driving Barbados silver palm to near extinction. Silver palm gets its generic name from a combination of the Latin word for berry (coccus), and the Greek word, Thrinax, meaning fan. The species name of barbadensis recognizes the island of Barbados.

Chamaerops humilis

Chamaerops humilis European fan palm   Palmae
 

European fan palm, Chamaerops humilis

http://www.floridata.com

European fan palm, Chamaerops humilis

Chamaerops humilis
Common Names: European fan palm
Family: Arecacea/Palmae (palm Family)
Palm Drought Tolerant Can be Grown in Containers Grows Well Indoors. Has evergreen foliage Has Unusual or Interesting Foliage

European fan palms
European fan palms form slowly expanding clumps with individual stems that can grow (very slowly) up to 15 ft in height. Download a large version of this Euro palm grove that graces the front plaza of the House of Representatives on the Florida State Capital grounds in Tallahassee.
Description
The attractive little European fan palm has become very popular in recent years, mostly due to its cold hardiness. Severe freezes in the mid-eighties decimated many other more tender palm species then being grown in central and northern Florida. Millions of dollars worth of landscape plants were killed, creating a demand for more cold resistant varieties that could withstand the occasional cold snap. This small fan leafed palm fit the bill. Not only can it resist temperatures below 20°F (-6° C) but it is fairly fast growing and drought resistant too!

The European fan palm forms clumps than can grow up to 15 ft (4.5 m) in height. The triangular, fan shaped leaves grow to about 20-24 in (50-60 cm) long by 24 in (60 cm) wide. They are deeply divided into multiple segments that are themselves split at the tip and they are supported on 3-4 ft (90-120 cm) stems. This is an extremely variable plant both in color (the leaves range from blue green to grey green to yellow green) and in shape. Some plants form suckers more freely than others to become very shrubby plants that may reach 15 ft (4.5 m) in width. Other individuals can be seen that are almost dwarf growing just 5 ft (1.5 m) tall by 4 ft (1.2 m) wide. These days it is popular to remove all but a few of the suckers and to prune the leaves to form a cluster of clear trunked “mini” palms (see photo).

Small, bright yellow flowers held close to the trunk are hidden behind the leaf stems which are armed with very sharp teeth. The flowers are followed in the fall by fruits which are dark yellow, orange or brown, and about 0.5 in (1 cm) in diameter.

European fan palm
The lower leaves were trimmed from the stems of this European fan palm to create a specimen that serves as the focal point of the parking lot (in this case) or yard in which it is planted.
Location
Chamaerops humilis is native to the hot dry hills and mountains of the Mediterranean Sea basin. Its native range extends from Africa’s Atlas Mountains in Morocco to Spain and France and eastward to Turkey.

Culture
The European Fan palm is very adaptable to many kinds of well drained soils.
Light: European fan palm prefers bright sunny locations, but it also does well in part shade with some direct sunlight. It will survive in rather heavy shade but “stretches” to lose its compact shape.
Moisture: Provide adequate moisture for fastest growth. This palm is very drought tolerant once established. It dislikes soggy soils.
Hardiness: USDA Zones 8-10. European fan palm is hardy throughout Florida. It can survive temperatures down to 10° F (-12° C). It even survives the occasional snowfall in its native habitat!
Propagation: European fan palm is usually propagated from seed. It can also be propagated by dividing clumps or removing suckers, methods that require superhuman effort. I once spent a weekend dividing a clump. The effort left me a sweaty, sore, bloody mess (from the sharp teeth on the leaf stems!) Believe me, seeds are the way to go! Better yet, reasonably priced specimens are readily available from nurseries and discount stores.

European fan palm produces short infloresences in the early spring upon which hundreds of small flowers are borne.
European fan palm seeds
These green, unripe seeds will soon ripen when they’ll darken, dry and fall from the plant.
Usage
Chamaerops humilis is as versatile as it is beautiful! With the leaves trimmed up to show off the trunk, it makes a beautiful specimen plant – a delightful natural sculpture to grace your patio or entryway. Unpruned, they assume an attractive shrubby form. Use one as a screen or plant several side by side to form a barrier. Planted in groupings, they will accent that hard-to-garden, bare corner of your yard.

The European fan palm is excellent in containers and urns. And thanks to its drought resistance and durability to heat it can thrive in harsh urban conditions. This palm is somewhat salt resistant and may be grown near the ocean if given some protection (behind a dune, building, etc.)

Features
Beauty, ruggedness, versatility, cold hardiness and drought resistance add up to make Chamaerops humilis a winner. If that isn’t enough, the European fan palm is also fairly fast growing when supplied with adequate moisture and fertilizer.

Chamaedorea metallica

Chamaedorea metallica metallic palm   Palmae
 

metallic palm, miniature fishtail palm, Chamaedorea metallica

http://www.floridata.com

metallic palm, miniature fishtail palm, Chamaedorea metallica

Chamaedorea metallica
Common Names: metallic palm, miniature fishtail palm
Family: Arecacea/Palmae (palm Family)
Palm Tolerant of Shade and Low Light Conditions Can be Grown in Containers Grows Well Indoors. Has Ornamental (non-edible) Fruit Has evergreen foliage Has Unusual or Interesting Foliage Flowers

Description
The popular and much loved metallic palm is the only palm we know that has foliage with a dark metallic blue green sheen like the color of gunmetal. This single stemmed palm has leaves in the shape of a chalice or fish’s tail being simple, undivided and notched at the tip. Other forms of this palms have leaves that are pinnately compound (feather shaped) with 4-7 linear or S-shaped leaflets. The erect leaves grow almost straight up to as much as 30 in (76 cm) long and 10-16 in (25.4-40.6 cm) wide. The stems of the metallic palm are 12-18 in (30.5-45.7 cm) long and up to 1 in (2.5 cm) in diameter. Metallic palm has attractive red, purple or orange flowers that yield small black fruits. The elliptical fruits are about a 0.5 in (1.3 cm) long and 0.3 in (0.8 cm) in diameter.

Location
Metallic palm occurs naturally in thick wet forests along the Atlantic slope and lowland rainforests of Mexico. Metallic palm often grows in limestone soils up to 2000 ft (610 m) above sea level.

Culture
Metallic palm thrives in moist, humus rich soil and is tolerant of alkaline limestone soils. Naturally undemanding for nutrients, metallic palm responds very well to regular applications of palm fertilizer. Metallic palm grows naturally in the understory of dense forests, and is tolerant of deep shade and low light conditions.
Light: Metallic palm grows well outdoors in deep shade or medium-bright light. As a houseplant, it thrives with 10-12 hours/day of artificial light.
Moisture: Metallic palm prefers uniformly moist, not wet, soil that has good drainage. It grows best in moderate to high humidity and indoor specimens benefit greatly from daily misting.
Hardiness: USDA Zones 9 – 12. Mature and established plants have been reported to tolerate temperatures down to 28ºF (-2.2ºC) for four days with no leaf damage. They will not survive temperatures below about 20ºF (-6.7ºC), though.
Propagation: Metallic palm can be propagated by seeds. Seeds are easiest to germinate if planted within 4-6 weeks after the fruit is ripe.

blue metal palm fruits
Metallic palm’s black fruits make snazzy contrast to the bright orange stalk.
Usage
Naturally tolerant of low light conditions, metallic palms are perfect for understory plantings and ideal as houseplants. Metallic palm stands out as a small accent plant due to its remarkable metallic evergreen foliage that provides spectacular backdrop for flowering plants in shade gardens. The metallic palm also will grow beautifully on the eastern side of a house where it will get little or no sunlight.

Features
This well-known and much loved palm is an endangered species and the only known palm with leaves having a blue-green metallic sheen. The metallic luster shows up particularly well when the leaves are moist. This small unique palm is one of the easiest to care for and makes one of the most ideal and durable house or shade palms known! The genus name Chamaedorea comes from the Greek words that mean ‘near-the-ground gifts’, and refers to the easy-to-reach fruits (pronounce it “kam-ah-DOOR-e-ah”).

WARNING
The fruits are NOT edible and the sap and juices may irritate sensitive skin.

Chamaedorea microspadix

Chamaedorea microspadix  hardy bamboo palm   Palmae
 

http://www.floridata.com

Chamaedorea microspadix
Common Names: hardy bamboo palm
Family: Arecacea/Palmae (palm Family)
Palm Fast Growing Tolerant of Shade and Low Light Conditions Grows Well Indoors. Has Ornamental (non-edible) Fruit Has Unusual or Interesting Foliage

Description
Hardy bamboo palm is a clump forming bamboo-like palm that distinguishes itself by its cold hardiness. Gardeners in mild climates who get occasional frosts can use this plant to extend their palm repertoire. Hardy bamboo palm forms clumps of slender stems up to 8 ft (2.4 m) in height. Papery matte-finish leaves are arranged sparsely up and down the stems. These pinnate leaves are up to 2 ft (60 cm) in length and are composed of leaflets, each about 8 in (20 cm) long by 1 in (2.5 cm) wide, attached along the midrib.

A drooping inflorescence appears in summer. Hardy bamboo palm is dioecious – male and female flowers are borne on separate plants. Female flowers are followed by the fruit which are bright orange berries about a quarter inch (6 mm) in diameter. These seem to light up the shade garden as they dangle in drooping clusters from the graceful stems.

Location
Chamaedorea microspadix is native to the forests of eastern Mexico.

Culture
Hardy bamboo palm is not particular about soil.
Light: This palm likes shady situations or filtered sunlight.
Moisture: Provide adequate water. Hardy bamboo palm is moderately drought resistant.
Hardiness: USDA Zones 8 – 11. This palm is surprisingly cold resistant. I have specimens that have survived temperatures as low as 18° F (-8° C).
Propagation: Plant fresh seed. It will germinate in 1 to 2 months – old seeds may take longer. Hardy bamboo palm also can be propagated by division of clumps.

Usage
Grow this understory palm beneath oaks trees, or use as a screen or backdrop for other plants in shady areas. Bamboo palm is great for entry ways and for patio planters and containers. This is a tough plant that, if cared for, will thrive in the urban landscape. The low light hardy bamboo palm makes a fine houseplant.

Features
Tough and easy to grow indoors and out, this little palm is a winner with its graceful bamboo-like habit and its showy fruit. Cold hardiness is what sets this palm apart from the many other species of Chamaedorea. Hardy bamboo palm is becoming increasingly popular. The tropical bamboo palm (C. seifrizii) is very similar in appearance and is commonly used as a houseplant and in commercial “interiorscapes.”

WARNING
Avoid handling the seeds with bare hands; like the seeds of many palms, hardy bamboo palm seeds contain oxalic acid, which can be a skin irritant.

Chamaedorea radicalis

Chamaedorea radicalis radicalis palm   Palmae
 

radicalis palm, Chamaedorea radicalis

http://www.floridata.com

radicalis palm, Chamaedorea radicalis

Chamaedorea radicalis
Common Names: radicalis palm
Family: Arecacea/Palmae (palm Family)
Palm Tolerant of Shade and Low Light Conditions Can be Grown in Containers Grows Well Indoors. Has Ornamental (non-edible) Fruit Has evergreen foliage Has Unusual or Interesting Foliage

Description
Chamaedorea radicalis is a rugged but charming dwarf palm that deserves to be famous. This pretty little palm is usually seen without a trunk. Although a slow grower this palm will produce, after many years, a short trunk covered with old leaf attachments. Radicalis palm grows from 3 – 4 ft (0.9 – 1.2 m) in height. If planted closely together in clusters they grow even taller as the leaves support one another producing a more erect form. When given the space, radicalis palm sprawls as its pinnate (feather) leaves relax into its more typical loosely open arrangement. Each plant has about 6-8 leaves that are about 3 ft (0.9 m) long with a short smooth petiole (leaf stem), that is 10 – 12 in (25 – 30 cm) in length. About 30 to 40 glossy, deep green leaflets are held in a flat plane along both sides of the leaf stem. These are about 10 – 14 in (25 – 36 cm) long and 0.5 – 0.75 in (1.3 – 1.9 cm) wide and droop gracefully toward the ground.

The male and female flowers are tiny and borne on separate plants like all of the species of Chamaedorea. They are held on 4 – 5 ft (1.2 – 1.5 m) singly branched inflorescences that reach above the leaves. This species blooms when quite young and it is not unusual to see palms already bearing seeds when only half their mature size! The female plants are particularly showy when adorned in their bright scarlet fruits. These are approximately 0.4 in in diameter and, also like many other members of this genus, may cause skin irritation due to the presence of corrosive oxalic acid (don’t grow these where children can reach the temptingly colored seeds).

Location
Radicalis palm is native to the shady forest floors of tropical Mexico.

Culture
This palm can adapt to most soils. In light infertile soil it will survive but grow very slowly. Moist well-drained soils rich in organic matter are recommended for best look and fastest growth.
Light: Very shade tolerant. Likes low light conditions but can take some direct sun. When growing radicalis palm indoors provide bright indirect light.
Moisture: Provide regular waterings when soil dries to maintain looks and growth rate. This palm is surprisingly tolerant of drought conditions.
Hardiness: USDA Zones 8 – 11. In Jack’s North Florida garden radicalis palm seedlings have endured temperatures to 10 F (-12 C) suffering only leaf damage and recovering the following season.
Propagation: By seeds which germinate irregularly over a 1 to 6 month period depending on temperature and freshness. I have success sowing them directly in the garden despite our Zone 8 cold snaps.

Usage
Radicalis palm is superb in shade gardens. Mass them in clusters at the rear of shady beds to serve as a background for colorful annuals like impatiens and begonias. Spaced farther apart they’ll erupt like fountains from expanses of groundcover. Use a single palm to anchor a container planting for shady patio or porch. The radicalis palm is a fine palm for indoor culture too. I grew some on my office windowsill for a couple of years where they thrived despite inattention and neglect.

The rich green of radicalis palm’s foliage makes a handsome backdrop for the female plant’s bright orange-red fruit.
Features
Radicalis palm is a close cousin of the hardy bamboo palm (Chamadorea microspadix) which is taller, has multple stems and non-glossy, lighter green leaves. Both are perfect for Zone 8B gardeners who are looking for durable, low maintenance and interestingly attractive items to grow in the shade. Those gardening in Zone 9 and warmer have even a greater selection of Chamadorea species to enjoy like the blue metal palm (C. metallica) and that familiar houseplant, the bamboo palm (C. seifrizii).

Chamaedorea seifrizii

Chamaedorea seifrizii bamboo palm palem bambu Arecacea/Palmae
 

bamboo palm, reed palm, Chamaedorea seifrizii

http://www.floridata.com

bamboo palm, reed palm, Chamaedorea seifrizii

Chamaedorea seifrizii
Common Names: bamboo palm, reed palm
Family: Arecacea/Palmae (palm Family)
Palm Tolerant of Shade and Low Light Conditions Can be Grown in Containers Grows Well Indoors. Has evergreen foliage Has Unusual or Interesting Foliage

The Bamboo Palm or Reed Palm is a relatively small graceful palm that grows to about 7 feet. Usually plants sold in nurseries or seen in collections are clumping with about 20 or 30 individual plants. Each stem is long and slender with “nodes” very similar in appearance to Bamboo. Although plants are commercially clumped together to form shrub-like specimens, this palm naturally spreads by suckers or offshoots also similar to Bamboo. The stems are tall and have about 10-15 fronds each with about 12 dark green pinnate leaflets. As the old fronds die, these should be trimmed off and the leaf bases or sheath allowed to dry out. Later these should be removed as this promotes good plant hygiene and exposes the attractive light green “bamboo stem”.

Although the Bamboo Palm is mostly used indoors as it prefers shade, it can withstand higher light and will produce flowers and fruit in these environments. The flowers arise from the leaf sheaths or covering and are dull yellow in color. The fruits are usually small pea-sized berries that are orange/red in color. Caution should be used with the fruit however as it is an irritant to humans!

Location
The Bamboo palm, like most of the Chamaedorea palms, is native to Mexico and Central America where it thrives as an understory palm. Today this palm is grown in most nurseries and is very common in malls, offices, homes and courtyards.

Culture
Very easy to grow and maintain. As with most palms, the soil should be well drained. Applying household fertilizer in the summer months will keep these palms green and healthy. The main insect problem with this palm is Spider Mite, which usually occurs in very dry areas indoors mostly in the winter months. As the webs produced are virtually invisible until it has damaged the plant significantly, a light but thorough spray mixture of water, alcohol and Safer’s Soap applied once a week should prevent this. Mealy Bug, Scale, Gliocladium blight and Phytopthora bud rot can also affect this palm but they far less commonly seen.
Light: Thrives in low indoor light but can tolerate some sunlight if acclimated.
Moisture: Keep evenly moist but not consistently wet.
Hardiness: USDA Zones 10 – 12.
Propagation: By seed which takes 6 months or more to germinate. Propagation by removing the suckers or offshoots from the parent plant is also common.

Usage
This graceful palm is mainly used as a specimen palm in offices, malls or homes. In warm climates (South Florida, Hawaii and California) it may be used in protected areas outside as a screen, hedge or accent to the landscape.

Features
This palm is inexpensive and easy to find as it is routinely offered for sale by discount chains, grocery stores and almost always available from garden centers. It may be offered under several names including C. erumpens as well as C. seifirizii. C. microspadix (hardy bamboo palm) is very similar in look but has larger, papery-textured leaves and can be grown outdoors in frost-prone areas to USDA Zone 8.

WARNING
The fruit of the Bamboo Palm is very toxic and should not be consumed!

Borassus flabellifer

Borassus flabellifer
Lontar palm
Lontar Palmae  

Borassus flabellifer, Lontar palm, Palm lontar

 

Borassus flabellifer, Lontar palm, Palm lontar

Sun Requirements: Light shade preferred when young.
Origin: Togo, Nigeria, India, Malaysia, ....  read more

Allagoptera arenaria

Allagoptera arenaria seashore palm   Palmae
 

seashore palm, coco da praia, Allagoptera arenaria

http://www.floridata.com

seashore palm, coco da praia, Allagoptera arenaria

Allagoptera arenaria
Common Names: seashore palm, coco da praia
Family: Arecacea/Palmae (palm Family)
Palm Attracts Birds Edible Plant Has evergreen foliage Has Unusual or Interesting Foliage

Description
The seashore palm may be the palm family’s answer to “pop art.” The leaves of the seashore palm emerge right out of the ground from a subterranean trunk that is rarely visible, and grow in a swirling pattern, spreading out on different and seemingly random planes. There are 6-15 bright green to silvery green pinnately compound (feather-like) leaves which range from 2-6 ft (0.6-1.8 m) long, with each leaflet about 2 ft (0.6 m) long. The seashore palm is a small palm, getting only about 6 ft (1.8 m) tall. The spiky flower stalks have both male and female flowers, so one plant can produce seeds by itself. The female flowers (and the fruits that follow) are borne in distinct spirals, adding to the unique growth pattern of this interesting palm. The fruits are yellowish green and shaped like small coconuts, about 1 in (2.5 cm) long and a half inch in diameter.

Location
The seashore palm is endemic to the Atlantic Coast of Brazil, where it grows in coastal strand, just above the high tide mark. Seashore palm is widely cultivated as an ornamental throughout South America.

Culture
In its native environment, the seashore palm is highly tolerant of poor soils that have good drainage. Considered a slow grower when it is young, the seashore palm responds very well to fertilizer and water.
Light: The seashore palm requires moderate to full sunlight.
Moisture: The seashore palm thrives in soils that are thoroughly moist and have excellent drainage.
Hardiness: USDA Zones 10 – 11. Mature and established plants have been reported by palm enthusiasts to tolerate temperatures down to 24ºF (-4.4ºC). A number of gardeners are now successfully growing the seashore palm in USDA Zone 9. Seashore palms grown in Zone 9 may require protection during cold spells.
Propagation: By seeds. The optimal germination conditions for seashore palm seeds include prolonged exposure to high temperatures from 90-100ºF (32-37.8ºC) and high humidity. Keep the seed moist at all times.

Usage
The seashore palm is undoubtedly one of the best palms for beach and coastal situations in subtropical and tropical settings. The seashore palm may be used as a beach screen and is very tolerant of extreme coastal and beach exposure, and salt spray. Seashore palm can be planted just above the high tide mark.

Features
The seashore palm is cultivated extensively in South America for the edible fruits which are eaten fresh or made into a drink. The leaves are used to make baskets and other woven objects.

The generic name of the seashore palm, Allogoptera, comes from the Greek words allage, meaning change, and pteron, meaning wing, and refers to the swirled, changing pattern of the feathery leaves. The species name, arenaria comes from the Latin, for sandy or growing in sandy sites.

Carpentaria acuminata

Carpentaria acuminata Carpentaria palm   Palmae
 

Carpentaria palm, Carpentaria acuminata

http://www.floridata.com

Carpentaria palm, Carpentaria acuminata

Carpentaria acuminata
Common Names: Carpentaria palm
Family: Arecacea/Palmae (palm Family)
Palm Fast Growing Has evergreen foliage Has Unusual or Interesting Foliage

Description
Similar in appearance to Christmas palm (Veitchia merrillii), Carpentaria Palm has an advantage in its faster growth. This tall, slender palm grows to 40 ft (12 m) on a single smooth grey trunk. The attractive crown is composed of 10-12 gracefully arching leaves, which are deep green on top and blue-green below. Each leaf has a pinnate or feather shape and is 5-6 ft (1.5-2 m) long with 2 ft (60 cm) long leaflets. Carpentarias have a smooth green crownshaft. Both male and female flowers occur on the same inflorescence and are green to white in color. The fruit is 0.5 in (12 mm) in diameter, red in color, and should be avoided as it is an irritant.

Location
Carpentaria acuminata is native to the rain forest areas of Australia’s Northern Territory, where it grows in flat lowland areas near lakes and rivers, and at the heads of salt water estuaries.

Culture
Despite requiring frequent watering, the Carpentaria Palm has flourished both in its native habitat and in cultivation. With wide soil adaptability and fast growth, this palm is a favorite.
Light: Carpentaria palm needs a bright, sunny location.
Moisture: Carpentaria Palm requires high moisture and/or irrigation and generally will not withstand periods of drought.
Hardiness: USDA Zones 10 – 12. This palm is very sensitive to cold and can be killed outright by heavy frosts.
Propagation: The seeds must be fresh – they will germinate in 1-3 months.

Usage
The Carpentaria Palm has been highly regarded in the nursery trade because of its attractive form and fast growth. Although it can be planted alone, it is best when planted in groups of 3 or more to create a “forest” setting. Because of its ultimate height, this palm should not be grown next to small buildings as its size will only make the structure appear that much smaller.

This graceful palm looks very attractive when used in street plantings. In tropical Darwin, Australia, it is a popular landscape item for lining boulevards and avenues. Note that the relatively short life span of Carpentaria palm requires that specimens be replaced about every forty years.

Features
Carpentaria Palms are a quick and easy way to landscape a residential or commercial area. Their graceful fronds give a great tropical feel and quickly grow to form an impressive accent to any area.

A point of possible confusion is the genus name. A very attractive North American evergreen shrub, called the California anemone, is named Carpenteria californica – note that this genus is spelled with an ‘e’. This plant was named for an American professor named Carpenter. The palm genus was named after Australia’s Gulf of Carpentaria, a landmark that actually lies at some distance east of this palm’s native habitat which is near Darwin.

WARNING
The fruit of the Carpentaria Palm is an irritant and should be avoided.