Occidozyga sumatrana, Sumatran Puddle Frog

Occidozyga sumatrana, Sumatran Puddle Frog 

Occidozyga-sumatrana

The Sumatran Puddle Frog (Occidozyga sumatrana) is a species of frog in the Ranidae family. It is endemic to Indonesia.

Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, rivers, intermittent freshwater marshes, and canals and ditches. It is threatened by habitat loss.

Limnonectes timorensis, Timor river frog

Limnonectes timorensis, Timor river frog

Limnonectes-timorensis

Limnonectes timorensis, common names the Timor river frog and Timor wart frog, is a species of frog in the family Ranidae.[1]

Description

This species has a brown band on its head that starts near the tip of its snout, continues along the canthus rostralis, and through the eye, and then completely envelops the tympanum.

It has warts on its skin that are normally located in a concentration on the dorsum. The fingertips of this species are somewhat swollen and wide at the tips. However, the ydo not have a marginal fold outlining the disk pad. The first finger is always longer than the second. There is a dorsolateral fold that starts from just behind the eye, and runs dorsally to the groin. The tympanum is almost equal in size to the eye.

Limnonectes modestus

Limnonectes modestus

Limnonectes-modestus

Limnonectes modestus is a species of frog in the Ranidae family. It is endemic to Indonesia.

Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical mangrove forests, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, rivers, intertidal marshes, rural gardens, urban areas, and heavily degraded former forest. It is not considered threatened by the IUCN.

Huia masonii, Javan Torrent Frog

Huia masonii, Javan Torrent Frog 

The Javan Torrent Frog (Huia masonii) is a species of frog in the Ranidae family. It is endemic to Indonesia.

Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, and rivers.

Huia-masonii

Javan Torrent Frog males use high-frequency communication to overcome the noise of their riverine habitats that is dominated by low frequencies. The second harmonic of the calls is ultrasonic. Warbles were highly diverse and may function as vocal signatures.

Huia cavitympanum, Hole-in-the-head frog

Huia cavitympanum, Hole-in-the-head frog 

Huia-cavitympanum

The Hole-in-the-head frog (Huia cavitympanum) is a species of frog in the Ranidae family. It is found on the island of Borneo. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, and torrential rivers. It is threatened by habitat loss.[1]

Vocalization

H. cavitympanum is the only known species of frog to vocalize at only an ultrasonic level.[2] The frogs have eardrums recessed in the side of the skull, with an ear canal similar to mammals’ anatomy. It appears to have evolved this higher pitch (more than 20 kHz) frequency of communication to circumvent the background noise of its waterfall habitat.

See also

  • Concave-eared Torrent Frog (Odorrana tormota)
  • Javan torrent frog (Huia masonii)

Ingerophrynus biporcatus, Double Crested Toad

Ingerophrynus biporcatus, Double Crested Toad 

Ingerophrynus-biporcatus

The Crested Toad or Double Crested Toad (Ingerophrynus biporcatus) is a species of toad in the Bufonidae family. It is endemic to Indonesia. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, rivers, plantations, rural gardens, and heavily degraded former forest. It is threatened by habitat loss.

Rhacophorus-pardalis, Gliding Tree Frog, Kodok

Rhacophorus-pardalis

 Gliding Tree Frog, Kodok

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Rhacophorus-pardalis-01-800

Rhacophorus pardalis is a species of frog in the Rhacophoridae family. It is found in Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montanes, freshwater marshes, and intermittent freshwater marches. It is threatened by habitat loss.

 

Polypedates colletti,  Hourglass tree frog

Polypedates colletti

  Hourglass tree frog

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Polypedates-colletti-02-800

Polypedates colletti is an elegant tree frog with a conspicuously acute snout. Most specimens have an hour-glass shaped figure on their backs. Coloration is usually shades of brown, but we have also seen more grayish individuals.

This frog is most often seen at a suitable breeding pond where adults perch in 1-2 m height on vegetation. For reproduction this species seems to prefer stagnant pools of water in the forest (uprooted trees, flooded depressions) with clear water and leaf litter bottom.

Size of adults: up to 50 mm in males, 80 mm snout-vent length in females.
Tadpoles have a unique marbled pattern on head, trunk, and tail. The iris rim is red. The tail terminates in a thin flagellum.

Tadpoles grow up to 33 mm total length.

We have seen tadpoles resting motionless on leaf litter or hovering in the water column of black-water ponds. They move slowly by beating their flagellum but can move rapidly when disturbed. During the day they hide under leaf litter.

 

Bufo melanostictus,  Asiatic Toad

Bufo melanostictus

Asiatic Toad

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Bufo-melanostictus-01-800

The Common Indian Toad or Common Asiatic/Asian Toad or Black-spined Toad Duttaphrynus melanostictus is a species of toad that is common in South Asia. The species grows to almost 20 cm long. The species breeds during the monsoons and the tadpoles are black. Young toads may be seen in large numbers after the monsoons.

Head with more or less elevated bony ridges, namely a canthal, a pre-orbital, a supra-orbital, a post-orbital, and a short orbito-tympanic; snout short, blunt; inter-orbital space much broader than the upper eyelid: tympanum very distinct, at least two thirds the diameter of the eye. First finger extending generally, but not always, beyond second; toes at least half webbed, with single sub-articular tubercles; two moderate metatarsal tubercles; no tarsal fold. The tarso-metatarsal articulation reaches the tympanum or the eye. Upper surfaces with more or less prominent, often spiny, warts; parotoids very prominent, kidney-shaped or elliptical, more or less elongate.
From India

Yellowish or brownish above, the spines of the warts and the ridges of the head generally black; beneath immaculate or more or less spotted. Male with a subgular vocal sac, and black nuptial excrescences on the two inner fingers.
A 7+ year old female

These toads are often seen at night under street lamps especially during times when winged termites swarm. They have been noted to feed on a wide range of invertebrates including scorpions. Tadpoles grown in sibling groups metamorphosed faster than those that were kept in mixed groups.Tadpoles have been shown to be able to recognize kin.