Penulisan

Penulisan

Click to Enlarge !

Penulisan_ton-800

The road gradually climbs along the crater rim beyond Kintamani, and is often shrouded in clouds, mist or rain. Penulisan is where the road bends sharply and heads down towards the north coast and the remote scenic drive to Bedugul. A viewpoint about 400m south from here offers an amazing panorama over three mountains: Gunung Batur, Gunung Abang and Gunung Agung.

Near the road junction, several steep flights of steps lead to Bali’s highest temple, Pura Puncak Penulisan (1745m). Inside the highest courtyard are rows of old statues and fragments of sculptures in the open bale. Some of the sculptures date back to the 11th century. The temple views are superb: facing north you can see over the rice terraces clear to the Singaraja coast (weather permitting).

Trunyan & Kuban

Trunyan & Kuban

Click to Enlarge !

Trunyan-800

The village of Trunyan is squeezed between the lake and the outer crater rim. It is inhabited by Bali Aga people, but unlike Tenganan in east Bali, it is not a welcoming place.

Trunyan is known for the Pura Pancering Jagat, with its 4m-high statue of the village’s guardian spirit, but tourists are not allowed to go inside. Touts and guides, however, hang about soliciting exorbitant tips.

A little beyond Trunyan, and accessible only by boat, is the cemetery at Kuban. The people of Trunyan do not cremate or bury their dead – they lay them out in bamboo cages to decompose. If you do decide to visit the cemetery you’ll be met by characters demanding huge fees (it is a tourist trap). Our advice: don’t go.

Lake boats leave from a jetty near Kedisan. The price for a four-hour return trip (Kedisan–Trunyan–Kuban–Toya Bungkah–Kedisan) depends on the number of passengers, with a maximum of seven people (the boat costs 440,000Rp, although extra ‘fees’ may be added). Our advice? If you’d like to spend time out on the lake, take one of the canoe trips with C.Bali.

Songan

Songan

Click to Enlarge !

Songan--800

Two kilometres around the lake from Toya Bungkah, Songan is a large and interesting village with market gardens extending to the lake’s edge. At the lakeside road end is Pura Ulun Danu Batur, under the edge of the crater rim.

A turn-off in Songan takes you on a rough but passable road around the crater floor. On the northwestern side of the volcano, the village of Toya Mampeh (Yeh Mampeh) is surrounded by a vast field of chunky black lava – a legacy of the 1974 eruption. Further on, Pura Bukit Mentik was completely surrounded by molten lava from this eruption, but the temple itself, and its impressive banyan tree, were quite untouched – it’s called the ‘Lucky Temple’.

Batur & Kintamani

Batur & Kintamani

Click to Enlarge !

Kintamani-800

The villages of Batur and Kintamani now virtually run together. Kintamani is famed for its large and colourful market, which is held every three days. The town is like a string bean: long, with pods of development. Activity starts early, and by 11am every­thing’s all packed up. If you don’t want to go on a trek, the sunrise view from the road here is good.

The original village of Batur was in the crater, but was wiped out by a violent eruption in 1917. It killed thousands of people before the lava flow stopped at the entrance to the village’s main temple. Taking this as a good omen, the village was rebuilt, but Gunung Batur erupted again in 1926. This time, the lava flow covered everything except the loftiest temple shrine. Fortunately, few lives were lost.

The village was relocated up onto the crater rim, and the surviving shrine was also moved up there and placed in the current temple, the ever-more-flambouyant Pura Batur. Spiritually, Gunung Batur is the second most important mountain in Bali (only Gunung Agung outranks it), so this temple is of considerable importance. It’s a great stop for the architectural spectacle. Within the complex is a Taoist shrine.

Kedisan & Buahan

Kedisan & Buahan

Click to Enlarge !

Kedisan-800

Kedisan

Buahan is a pleasant 15-minute stroll from Kedisan, and has market gardens going right down to the lakeshore.

Villages Around Danau Batur

Villages Around Danau Batur

Click to Enlarge !

Around-Danau-Batur_ton-800

The little villages around Danau Batur have a crisp lakeside setting and views up to the surrounding peaks. There’s a lot of fish farming here, and the air is pungent with the smell of onions from the myriad tiny vegetable farms. You’ll also see chillies, cabbage and garlic growing, a festival for those who like assertively flavoured food. The lake has ever-more fish farms.

A hairpin road winds its way down from Penelokan to the shore of Danau Batur. At the lakeside you can go left along the road that twists through lava fields to Toya Bungkah. Watch out for huge sand trucks battering the road into dust as they haul materials for construction across Bali.

http://www.lonelyplanet.com/indonesia/villages-around-danau-batur

– Gunung Batur Area

Gunung Batur Area

Click to Enlarge !

Gunung-Batur-Area_to-800

This Gunung Batur area is like a giant bowl, with the bottom half covered by water and a set of volcanic cones jutting out of the middle. Sound a bit spectacular? It is. On clear days – vital to appreciating the spectacle – the turquoise waters wrap around the newer volcanoes, which have obvious old lava flows oozing down their sides.

In 2012 Unesco honoured the area by proclaiming the region a part of the Global Geoparks Network, of which there are over 90 worldwide. So far this has meant little on the ground, although some interesting signs detailing the unique geology of the area have started to appear on the road between Kedisan and Toya Bungkah.

The road around the southwestern rim of the Gunung Batur crater is one of Bali’s most important north–south routes and has one of Bali’s most stunning vistas.

Day trippers should bring some sort of wrap in case the mist closes in and the temperature drops to 16°C.

The villages around the Gunung Batur crater rim have grown together in a continuous untidy strip. The main village is Kintamani, though the whole area is often referred to by that name. Coming from the south, the first village is Penelokan, where tour groups first stop to gasp at the view.

http://www.lonelyplanet.com/indonesia/bali/gunung-batur-area