Bali Mandara Toll Road

Bali Mandara Toll Road

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Bali Mandara Toll Road or Nusa Dua-Ngurah Rai-Benoa Toll Road is a tolled causeway bridge stretch across the Gulf of Benoa 12.7 km in length. The Rp 2.48 Trillion (USD 220 million) highway [1] connect the city of Denpasar and South Kuta, Badung Regency also the Ngurah Rai International Airport. The reason behind construction of Bali Mandara Toll Road was to prevent traffic jams on the Ngurah Rai By Pass Road, previously the only road connecting areas of Bali south of the airport with areas north of the airport. The Ngurah Rai By Pass Road, a land-based route, could not be widened because the right-of-way was already occupied by the Ngurah Rai International Airport’s runway. Consequently, the Bali Mandara Toll Road was built over water.

This toll road was officially opened on 23 September 2013 by President of Indonesia Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono. [2]

Tukad Bangkung Bridge

Tukad Bangkung Bridge

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Tukad Bangkung Bridge Bali, One of the Highest in Asia

Do you know if Bali has one of the highest bridge in Asia? Tukad Bangkung Bridge in Plaga Village, Petang Sub District, Badung Regency, Bali that inaugurated on December 19, 2006 is the bridge that connecting three districts each of Badung, Bangli, and Buleleng. This bridge has a height of 71.14 meters and a construction resistant to earthquakes up to 7 Richter Scale with up to 360 meters long and 9.6 meters wide. It is the sixth longest in Indonesia, the longest in Bali, and is one of the highest in Asia.

The bridge that inaugurated by President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono has the function to replaces the old tourist route that connects the streets of Denpasar, Sangeh, Petang, and Kintamani-Bangli that its location was 500 meters in the south from Tukad Bangkung Bridge. The old road is on bad condition also has a slope up to 40 degrees or very steep so that very heavy road field by large vehicles such as trucks or tour buses crossed this area. Tukad Bangkung Bridge construction also cut the mileage of the old route about 6 kilometers along.

Tukad Bangkung Bridge built using balanced cantilever technology, with the estimated life cycle for 100 years. The view of the bridge that built since 2001 are designed similar to other conventional bridge in Bali and are not built using a roof on it for reasons that do not reduce the surrounding scenery. USD $ 49 billion required to build Tukad Bangkung Bridge with pure funds budget comes from Bali Province Government.

It takes approximately 1 hour drive to north of Denpasar to reach the location of Tukad Bangkung Bridge. During the journey you will pass other interesting places such as Sangeh, Tanah Wuk, Petang Village, and Nungnung Waterfall. This bridge can also be accessed through the Kintamini route. Arriving at the location, you will see many small shops lined up in every corner of the bridge, and this shop is the right place to seing the scene of Tukad Bangkung Bridge. Incredible views of the bridge accompanied by the cool mountain air will relieve your fatigue. Admire the Tukad Bangkung Bridge as one of the highest bridge in Asia is worthy to included into your travel agenda during your stay in Bali.

Telaga Waja River

Telaga Waja River

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Telaga Waja river begin in the foothill of the secret mount Agung (the highest mount in Bali), the river has clear white water, nature life and green plantation surrounding. Besides as the source of water for daily life and irrigation, Telaga Waja river as blessing become a popular white water rafting runner for travelers of all over the world. Telaga waja river has class 3 rapids, length of rafting trip is approximately 12 Km and takes about 2 hours.

Nung Nung Waterfall, Lawak, Belok Sidan Village

Nung Nung Waterfall, Lawak, Belok Sidan Village

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Nung Nung Waterfall is set within a dense jungle. The waterfall can be reached on foot via a well-defined staircase with a 45 degree angle. Located at the Lawak, Belok Sidan Village in the North Badung around one hour journey from Denpasar.

Golden Valley Waterfall, Munduk

Golden Valley Waterfall, Munduk

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Bali hosts several waterfalls. Among these is the Golden Valley waterfall, located close to Munduk. To get there, you need to go down a narrow path and help yourself with a walking stick that’s given to you at the starting point. The path goes between numerous trees: coffee trees, banana trees… When you get all the way down, the view is astounding and a tiny little restaurant permits to have a coffee, tea or fresh juice in front of the waterfall.

Angseri Hot Springs, Munduk

Angseri Hot Springs, Munduk

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Need some privacy in a closed cabin to relax and enjoy the hot waters without any outside interference? Angseri Hot Springs is the Answer. Angseri Hot Springs nestled between lush rice paddies and small streams, precisely in Banjar Munduk Lumbang, Angseri Village, Baturiti District, Tabanan Regency. Places that used only as a traditional bathhouse by the local people, now transformed into a comfortable bathing area, with only Rp 3,000 (entrance fee) was able to enjoy the warmth of the hot spring pools.

It is only 2 hours drive from Denpasar taking the direction to go to Bedugul. If you are a little confused with the location of Angseri Hot Springs, asking some locals around may be can help you. You can also reach it coming from Penebel through Jatiluwih going north-east as well, but then it’s a bit more difficult to find. Coming closer to the destination you will see black and white signs “Air Panas”, which means Hot Spring in Bahasa Indonesia.

The whole area is surrounded by green vegetation, mainly bamboo, palm and fern trees, as well as cultivated rice paddies, where you can sometimes see the local farmers going after their work in the rice fields.

Angseri Hot Springs offers 2 open-air pool, and 4 small private cabins, with rooms for up to 6 people max. Only Rp 10.000,- (USD 1) for each visitor, you can call one of the cabins for 30 minutes (if a visitor to this place relatively quiet, you can call as long as you want :p). For the public open-air pool, the cost is free! The private cabins are cleaned after every visitor and the water is exchanged completely as well. The whole place is practically only a few years old and hygiene looks very good. Early afternoon, the open-air pool is already emptied and cleaned for the next day to come. So make sure you arrive not later than lunch time to use this one.

This place is also equipped with a canteen that sells food and drink typical of Bali, like tipat cantok and young coconut. So after enjoy the hot waters, do not be afraid to go hungry.

Angseri Hot Springs is a potential place as tourist destination in Bali due to the place is unique with original hot water surrounded by green vegetation. It is many visited by local and foreign tourists who want to take a bath in the hot water while enjoy the natural nature surround it.

Sekumpul waterfall

Sekumpul waterfall

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here are waterfalls scattered throughout the green jungles of the northern part of the Island of the Gods.

People tend to equate tourism in the northern part of Bali to a visit to Lovina Beach. However, in addition to the dolphin shows found in Lovina, there are other, attractive, tourist attractions, such as waterfalls. Buleleng may be called a paradise for waterfalls. The deep inlets of the forests within this District, which covers an area of 1,300 square kilometres, are littered with waterfalls. Some of these sites attract many visitors, while others remain untouched because they are difficult to reach.

On my way to the village of Sekumpul, on a bend in the road, I caught a glimpse of a waterfall in the distance. A woman carrying firewood, who happened to be passing by, told me its name—Lemukih Waterfall. I parked my motorbike on the side of the street and walked 200 metres along a footpath that wound its way along beside a river. The pretty little waterfall has three streams. The one on the right was about four metres high while the other two were so short that they looked more like rapids. What was unique was that the waters of these two streams trace back to a spring in a cave and not the river. At the foot of Lemukih was a big wide pool that would entice anyone to plunge in.

Lemukih is an example of a waterfall that seldom sees visitors because of a lack of publicity and supporting facilities. There weren’t any signs to guide visitors. When I was there, it was deserted and quiet even though it was Saturday, the day when visitors flock the tourist attractions in Bali. I continued on my journey to find the waterfall in Sekumpul village. I have wanted to see it for a long time. Pictures of this waterfall, one of the main tourist attractions in Buleleng, Some people call it the most gorgeous waterfall in Bali.

After driving for about another two kilometres, I found a signpost that said “Welcome to Sekumpul Waterfall” at the mouth of a dirt road. I followed it for what seemed like forever, only to realize that the sign had been a fake in the end. Fortunately, I met several kind women who showed me the way to the waterfall. It is definitely more helpful to ask locals than relying on street signs or brochures when you are trying to find specific locations in remote areas.

I turned back and found another sign that said “Waterfall” at the roadside. This time it was the right one. I drove along an undulating village lane that twisted and turned for about one kilometre and, finally, arrived at the parking lot near Sekumpul Waterfall. The price of admission was IDR 2,000 per person (IDR 5,000 for foreign visitors). I continued my expedition on foot along a slippery cement path that was overgrown with green moss.

Then, I had to descend hundreds of steps hemmed in by many shady trees before crossing a river with brown coloured water. After a while, the cemented road was replaced by a dirt road. A bale bengong (gazebo) standing on the roadside served as a vantage point that offers amazing views of the waterfall from a distance. It turned out there was more than one waterfall, each separated by a series of dense jungle. This phenomenon inspired the name Sekumpul Waterfall (“Group of Waterfalls”).

I was mesmerized. Now I understood why people considered this to be the most beautiful waterfall in Bali. Out of the seven waterfalls here, I only had time to visit two. They were close to each other but each had different water sources. The waterfall on the left came from a spring, while the one on the right, which was higher up, came from the river. This is why the one on the right turns dirty brown while its neighbour remains clear during the rainy season.

In order to reach the waterfall, I had to descend hundreds of steps down a steep slope. Then, I had to cross a river whose water was thigh high. Shorts and mountain sandals are the wise choice of outfit for a challenge like this. When I eventually arrived at the foot of the waterfall, it felt like every drop of sweat was paid back in full. In front of me, the majestic waterfall tumbled 80 metres, tirelessly pouring countless gallons of water every second.

It crashed down violently onto the rocks with a rumbling sound that subverted the serenity of the green forest. Sitting in front of such grandeur of nature make humans seem small and meaningless. A group of people seemed to be enjoying the cool water at the foot of the waterfall. Although located deep in the interior, Sekumpul is fairly well known. On weekends and during holidays its plunge pool turns into a public swimming pool.

We should commend the efforts of the local community and the visitors to keep the beauty of this place intact. Moreover, there were no buildings or litter in the vicinity of the waterfall. I was fascinated by the glory of Sekumpul. Although the water plummets in the same way without pause, a waterfall is never boring to behold. It felt like watching a favourite movie, over and over. A pleasing repetition.

Petanu River – Blahbatuh

Petanu River – Blahbatuh

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The ridges and valley between the Pakrisan and the Petanu rivers, flowing north-south from Mt Batur, were home to some of the earliest settlements and kingdoms of Bali. No less than 40 ancient temples are found in this narrow strip of land, which harbors the richest collection of antiques on the island.