Bali, Furniture

Bali, Furniture

Furniture-01_ton-800

Furniture-02_ton
Furniture-03_tone
Furniture-04_ton
Furniture-05_t
Furniture-06_ton
Furniture-07_tone
Furniture-08_to
Furniture-09_tone

Balinese furniture styles include teak indoor and outdoor, Garden / Patio furniture, Woven furniture, featuring Synthetic or organic materials, Rattan, Banana Leaf, Water Hyacinth and Sea Grass or a combination of wood and all of the above fibers.

Java Gebyok Doors

Java Gebyok Doors

Click to Enlarge !

Java-Doors-06_to

Click to Enlarge !

Click to Enlarge !

Java-Doors-07_to-800

Click to Enlarge !

Java-Doors-08_ton-800

Java-Doors-01_t-800

Java-Doors-02_to

Click to Enlarge !

Java-Doors-03_ton-a-800

Click to Enlarge !

Java-Doors-04_to-800

Java-Doors-05_to

Gebyok is a traditional room partition, It may include door & is made from teak or jack wood.  It
can also serve as decorative item inside the house  and it’s heavily hand-carved.

– Joglo Houses Interior

Joglo Houses Interior

Joglo-02_to

Joglo-03_to

Joglo-06_ton
Joglo-08_ton

Click to Enlarge !

Joglo-11_ton-800

Click to Enlarge !

Joglo-12_to-800

Click to Enlarge !

Joglo-14_to-800

Click to Enlarge !

Joglo-15_to-800

Click to Enlarge !

Joglo-16_to-800

Click to Enlarge !

Joglo-17_to-800

A Pendopo or Pendapa is a fundamental element of Javanese architecture; a large pavilion-like structure built on columns. Either square or rectangular in plan, it is open on all sides and provides shelter from the sun and rain, but allows breeze and indirect light. The word pendopo is a variant on the Sanskrit word mandapa (‘hall’). The Dutch writer Multatuli in his colonial reformist novel Max Havelaar described the pendopo as “next to a broad-rimmed hat, an umbrella or a hollow tree, a pendopo is undoubtedly the simplest representation there is of the concept of ‘roof'”.

Derived from ancient Javanese architectural elements, pendopo are common ritual spaces primarily intended for ceremony, and also for a variety of purposes such as receiving guests in the compounds of wealthy Javanese, and even as cottage industry work spaces. Pendopo can be constructed as a stand alone structure or attached to walled inner structure called dalem, it formed the front part of Joglo, Javanese traditional house.

History

The oldest surviving images of ancient Java vernacular architecture appears in Borobudur reliefs, among others the stepped roof type pendopo. They once sheltered the institutions of ancient Javanese kingdoms, such as law courts, clergy, palaces, and for public appearances of the king and his ministers. In 9th century Ratu Boko complex near Prambanan, there is traces of square elevated stone bases with umpaks, stones with hole to put wooden pillars on it. The similar structures also can be found in 14th century Trowulan dated from Majapahit era, where square brick bases with umpak stones suggest that some pendopos once stood there. Because the pillars and the roof was made from wooden organic material, no trace of the pendopo roof remains. The pendopo with faithful Majapahit brick-base style can be found in 16th century Kraton Kasepuhan, Cirebon, as well as 17th century Kota Gede, Yogyakarta. These evidences suggests that the design has not changed much for over a millennia.

They remain fundamental components of Javanese kraton (‘palaces’) with European influences often being incorporated since the 18th century. The majority of pendopo are constructed from timber but masonry versions are in existence such as used in the Kraton Kanoman in Cirebon. Wealthy modern day home builders, in attempting to design homes that draw on traditional Javanese experience of space, have dismantle, transported and re-assembled pendopo forming modern-traditional hybrid homes.

– Joglo houses exterior

Joglo houses exterior

Click to Enlarge !

Joglo-01_ton-800

Click to Enlarge !

Joglo-04-800

Click to Enlarge !

Joglo-05_to-800

Click to Enlarge !

Joglo-07_ton-800

Click to Enlarge !

Joglo-09_tone-800

Joglo-10_to

Click to Enlarge !

Joglo-13_ton-800

Joglo-18_ton

Joglo is a traditional vernacular house of Javanese people. It consist of two parts; the pendopo and dalem. The pendopo is the front section of Joglo that have large roofed space with columns and without wall or partition. The dalem is the inner sections with walled enclosure and rooms such as bedroom and kitchen. Pendopo is used to receive guests, reception hall and living room, while the inner dalem are more private sections of the house. The term “Joglo” is often used to refer the distinctive type of Javanese roof with rising central part of roof supported by four or more main wooden columns (saka guru). The outer row of columns with rectangular plan created expansion spaces. The roof formed a pyramid-like structure with central part are taller and steeper. It is said that the roof of Joglo is constructed to mimic a mountain.

Social status

In a structured Javanese society and tradition, Joglo also reflect Javanese social status; this type of building is only reserved for palace (keraton), official residence, government estate, and the house of nobles (ningrat). Originally commoners are not allowed to construct this kind of house as their residence.

Types of Joglo

  1. Joglo Limasan Lawakan (atau “Joglo Lawakan”).
  2. Joglo Sinom
  3. Joglo Jompongan
  4. Joglo Pangrawit
  5. Joglo Mangkurat
  6. Joglo Hageng
  7. Joglo Semar Tinandhu

A fantastic video, building a Joglo House

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=CxylGtYeggU