Acrochordus granulatus, Indian Wart Snake

Acrochordus granulatus

 Indian Wart Snake

Acrochordus granulatus is a snake species found from India through Southeast Asia to the Solomon Islands. It is completAcrochordus granulatus, Indian Wart Snakeely aquatic and almost helpless on land. No subspecies are currently recognized.

This species is completely aquatic and nearly helpless on land. Their thin skin rips easily, but has a very rough texture; hence their common name. They are sexually dimorphic, with males being much smaller and having a more highly contrasting color pattern. They are found mainly in small ponds, swamps and estuaries, but has also been found at sea.
Geographic range

Found from both coasts of peninsular India though Southeast Asia, the Indo-Australian Archipelago and northern Australia to the Solomon Islands. This includes Myanmar, the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, China (Hainan), the Philippines (Luzon, Cebu and Batayan), Malaysia, Indonesia (Sumatra, Java, Borneo, Flores, Timor, Sulawesi, Ternate, Ambon, and coastal Irian Jaya), Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands the coast along northern Australia (Northern Territory and eastern Queensland. No type locality was given with the original description, although Smith (1943) gives "India" and Saint-Girons (1972) gives "Inde."
Feeding

According to Shine (1991), 50% of the acrochords tested for stomach contents yielded either rainbow fish, grunters, cat fish or sleepy cod. There is no evidence suggesting that they feed on amphibians. Occasionally known to eat eels. Their rough skin is used for the purpose of underwater constriction, which is how they hold onto their prey. Females are ambush predators while males forage actively.